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What is the best way to deal with a hive in this situation? I don't want to lose a whole hive if there would be a way to introduce a queen...but if I do have to kill off the hive or shake it out how should I go about doing it..like how far from other hives?
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Sam
I have shook them out on the ground 30 or 40 yards from where they are and moved the hive back to the place where it was and introduced a new queen but I have read that it doesn`t always work. Some folks just shake them on the ground in the bee yard and take the boxes away and let them drift into other hives, me I like to try to save every hive I can but thats just me :eek:
 

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If you try introducing a new queen they will kill her instantly. Order a new marked queen. The day your queen arrives,put the problem hive in a wheelbarrow, leaving the bottom board.Move the problem hive at least 100yds. away. One by one shake every last bee of the frames onto the grass.put each empty frame(without bees) into spare empty hive bodys you have standing by.These should be at least 20ft. away from where you shook out. Make sure no bees return to the empty frames, Use your outer cover to cover your now beeless frames.When you have removed every bee from every frame, use the wheelbarrow to return the old (now beeless) frames to the original hive bodies. Place the hive to its original location on the bottom board, and transfer all the beeless frames to to the original hive bodies.Some bees will be there waiting on you ,these are the older foraging bees,(not the younger laying bees).They will be lost in the grass where you put them.Now you can safely introduce your new queen.
 
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