Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a hive that I split earlier this spring. The new hive had everything they could want, eggs, brood, stores etc. Now I look and have 2-3 eggs in some cells, indicating that I have a laying worker. I am wondering if it is easiest to buy a queen and before introducing her, shake off all the bees and return all the frames, (beeless) to the same spot? theory being that the laying worker can't find her way back to the hive, then introduce new queen. Or is there another way? And what happens to the cells with the multiple eggs? do they hatch or what?

Thanks!

Krista
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,473 Posts
You need to treat the hive like it was a deadout: Shake out all the bees, remove 3 or 4 empty frames & add same amount of brood & honey, add new queen, leave alone other than feeding for a couple weeks. If you try to add a queen to what is left now, just throwing away a new queen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
Do what you said but take the hive 100 yards from the original spot, then take the empty hive back to the original spot and put it back where it was, there will be some bees waiting for you.the laying worker cannot find its way home because they have never left the hive. The next day put a mated queen in the hive. And yes those eggs will hatch but will bee drones. This is because the laying worker cannot bee mated so all the eggs will be infertile in which case they turn into drones.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
869 Posts
Do what you said but take the hive 100 yards from the original spot, then take the empty hive back to the original spot and put it back where it was, there will be some bees waiting for you.the laying worker cannot find its way home because they have never left the hive. QUOTE]


That's not always the case, you don't know if that laying worker has ever left the hive or not, plus there is a chance that you have more than one LW. I moved a hive from a remote location before I tried this method, and she still found her way home. I think that the bees that knew where the hive was probably put out the scent and brought her back. I recently resolved my LW by transplanting couple of queen cells into the hive when I found them in another.

C2
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,940 Posts
Personally I would drop a frame of fresh eggs in there one a week for several weeks and let them make a new queen. The brood pheromone is what keeps laying workers in check.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
706 Posts
the best and only way I know of is this. order your queen when she get to you. take your hive and leave the bottom board on the stand move the hive 100 yards. take two empty deeps with you and a extra outer cover. place the emty deeps 20 feet away from your hive you just moved take out each fram and shake it clean of all bees. They have to be bee free 100% place it in the empty deep move them back to to were you had your hive the foragers will return but the laying workers and nurse bees will not. then it is safe to introduce your new queen. that is the oly 100% way i know of.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
706 Posts
old timer the only problem with that is there are more then one laying worker and they will kill any queen you have to get rid of the layers.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top