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I have a double deep nuc colony that came through winter queenless-no eggs, no brood, and no queen to be found. About 10 days ago I added what I was pretty sure was a frame full of new eggs from another hive for them to get started on making a queen. The nuc blew off of it's stand today so I went through everything as I put it back together. Now it appears that there is a laying worker--very eratic pattern of drone brood on several frames. Even more strange though is that I don't see much sign of worker larvae on the frame that I donated from the other hive--I was expecting a pretty good pattern of capped brood and some queen cells by now. Here are my questions:

*Will the presence of a laying worker stop the other workers from making a queen from viable eggs?

*Will eggs/larvae from another colony sometimes be rejected and eaten or expelled from the receiving colony? [The other possibilities are that whatever I thought were eggs really were not (I'm pretty sure they were) or that the eggs did not survive the transfer process (but it was not an especially cool day and I didn't have them out for very long at all).]

*For shutting down the laying worker, is there an alternative to shaking them all off the frames 100+ feet from the hive or is that the best way to get rid of her before I add any more eggs to the nuc to try for a queen again?

Thanks for your input!
 

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I don't have any great advice to get rid of the laying worker - but I had the same thing happen last year. I gave the queenless hive a frame of eggs and within a day or two the eggs were gone. I gave them another and the same thing happened again. I finally combined the two hives. ( i was able to confirm I did not have a laying worker before I did the combine )

I don't know why they reject eggs sometimes. I only walked one frame about 6 feet across to the other hive. - I even included the worker bees on the frame when I did it so I don't think the eggs chilled or anything like that.:scratch:

best of luck
 

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The problem with "getting the laying worker out" is that there are thousands of them. You need to get they laying out of the workers. To do that, put a frame of open brood in every week for three weeks...

http://www.bushfarms.com/beeslayingworkers.htm
 

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Laying worker hives are more work than they are worth. IMHO it is better to start a new split then waste frame after frame on a laying worker hive. I know people with lower hive counts want to save every hive, but sometimes knowing where to cut your losses is equally important. I would combine the laying worker hive with a strong hive using the newspaper method.

I use to go to school up near Chambersburg at PSU Mt Alto. How is the beekeeping out that way?
 

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Sometimes placing a frame of eggs every week for 1-4 weeks resolves the problem, however we have not had much success with this method. It is diffucult for me to justify this amount of time and effort to resolve the laying worker problem so we usually do a newspaper combine and be done with it. We will re-split the hive later when they have built up. Good luck
steve
 

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ive no bees but a year worth of research so if you dont think my idea is a option thats ok:lookout:

if the problem is with a nuc im presuming that there are 5 frames :scratch:

do you have any other nuc box's if so split the nuc into 2 (3 frames in one and 2 in the other) after a day or two check to see which has the laying worker, if necessary split down again from this.

this way you can windle out the layer, with the lose of only one or 2 frames rather than all the nuc an will save yourself weeks of brood/eggs
 

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Peacekeeper and Yuleluder, have you ever had the queenless hive kill the queen in the queen right hive using the newspaper method, as M. Bush suggests might happen?
 

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I have had a few combines that did not make it, not sure if the queen was killed or not (I didn't research it any further) they just didn't make it. MOST do make it, come out stronger and the laying worker problems are resolved. My purpose for the combine is the same as Yulelander, the time and effort involved in dealing with this problem over several weeks only to fail (more often than not) is not worth the hassle-- and I could have made a new split with those 3 or 4 frames of brood. If you have the time, resources, and inclination to try MB's method go for it (I'm not speaking against MB's advice as his website and advice on this forum have been a huge benefit to me and my business), it has worked for me in the past but very rarely...same with the shake out method.. it has worked for me but again, rarely. Good luck :)
 

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You can get rid of the laying workers real easy. Seal the hive with duct tape, place the hose from a CO2 bottle in under the lid and give them a 30 second blast then close and tape the lid. This will kill all the laying workers! Or place the hive in a contractor size garbage bag and seal the bag. Come back in 24 hours and the laying workers will be gone (dead).
 

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Everytime I have had a laying worker hive it has been fairly weak. So I think the stronger hive that I combined the laying worker with was easily able to fight off the laying workers. From what I understand the laying workers will stop laying once they are exposed to a good queen pheromone.
 

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you have to catch queen from the strong hive put it in the cage with honey and put it into laying workers hives and then change hives places. strong hive must be aside the laying bees hive you should do it about 11am or 12 whenever real workers goes out of the hive and bring nectar. so whenever you change places real workers will destroy laying workers whenever they see their queen in the cage in the evening your hive will be empty from laying workers.
thanks ilia from CaucASUS
 

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I notice nobody seems to mention emptying the hive onto the ground 100 yards away and replacing it in its original place. The idea being that the nurse bees, including laying workers, will not be able to find their way back. Is that one of those B.S. ways of fixing the problem that doesn't really work?
 

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CO2 tank-For running air staplers when making packages or a serious paintballer.

Ether-The etherbunny:D
 

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CO2 is also used by folks inseminating queens. A little dose of CO2 knocks out the queen. IIRC, the CO2 blast also stimulates the queen's sex organs.
 
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