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I have a hive that was two deeps last season and I have reduced it to one deep. They are really only utilizing part of the deep. But, there is brood in the frames. Does not seem to be taking off like my others after the winter. Do I have a laying worker? Cant seem to find a queen. But, I am bad at finding them.

Should I steal a frame of brood from another hive and hope they make a queen? I could swap there location with a stronger hives location to get all the workers returning to give them a boost.? Could collapse them down to a Nuc.? I could combine them or get a new queen for them.
 

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If laying workers, you should see many cells with multiple eggs. They won't be placed on the bottom of the cell and standing up like queen laid eggs, but will be at weird angles like these...



Also, you will often find a queen cell cup within the brood pattern with multiple eggs, too...like this...

 

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i did my second spring inspection last week and noticed my brood pattern was scattered about, but non of them appeared to be drone cells so i am hopeing ( with crossed fingers) that the queen was just in a wandering mood for the first of the spring build up. the girls seemed to be in a good mood as well so if that is any indicator i should be in ok shape.
 

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Well, crud. I think I may have killed an exceptional laying worker. My second hive has been queenless for a couple of weeks. I've put frames of eggs and brood in, hoping they'd make a queen. But, today, I saw new capped cells and a worker plopping her fanny in cells. I looked again. "You're not putting your fanny in that cell are you?" She goes to another cell, wags her fanny, wipes it, and then drops it into another cell. "You are!" Well, I "chased" her to the other side of the frame and grabbed her, or so I thought it was her, and squished her. Now, I'm wondering if I shouldn't have. The pattern is tight and it's all worker. My only issue is that they're testy. They don't sting, but they chase and buzz heads, I've had a couple get caught in my hair. Not fun. If I didn't kill her, should I leave her or empty the box and requeen?
 

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So, I think I have a laying worker in a hive that I inherited from a neighbor. At first I thought the hive was queenless as I couldn't see any eggs and there was no brood present so I bought a new queen and put her in. Now, after two days when I went to see if they released the queen, I am seeing eggs similar to the pics shown here and there is some open brood in the medium hive body. There are no eggs or brood in the deep. So there is either a young queen they made or a laying worker. I guess they killed my new queen as I could not find her. What do I do?
 

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If you have multiple eggs you have hundreds if not thousands of laying workers.

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesfallacies.htm#onelayingworker

http://www.bushfarms.com/beeslayingworkers.htm

See page 9 of "The Wisdom of the Hive"

"Although worker honey bees cannot mate, they do possess ovaries and can produce viable eggs; hence they do have the potential to have male offspring (in bees and other Hymenoptera, fertilized eggs produce females while unfertilized eggs produce males). It is now clear, however, that this potential is exceedingly rarely realized as long as a colony contains a queen (in queenless colonies, workers eventually lay large numbers of male eggs; see the review in Page and Erickson 1988). One supporting piece of evidence comes from studies of worker ovary development in queenright colonies, which have consistently revealed extremely low levels of development. All studies to date report far fewer than 1 % of workers have ovaries developed sufficiently to lay eggs (reviewed in Ratnieks 1993; see also Visscher 1995a). For example, Ratnieks dissected 10,634 worker bees from 21 colonies and found that only 7 had moderately developed egg (half the size of a completed egg) and that just one had a fully developed egg in her body."

If you do the math, in a normal booming queenright hive of 100,000 bees that's 70 laying workers. In a laying worker hive it's much higher.
 

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So, is it a laying worker or workers or just a young queen just trying to figure things out? The egg pattern seems to suggest a worker. I have to go back and check the deep to see if the pattern persists. If it is a worker, what do you think are the chances of saving the hive?
 
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