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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My friend gave me a small split. I have not been able to get this split queenright. Two queen cells both hatched, neither appeared to make it back or be viable. Now it is a laying worker hive. Although curiously, there is another capped queen cell. I am not going to put any more resources into this hive.

Should I:

1. Combine the bees with some queen right nucs who could use the bees, comb and stores? Would this risk the laying worked killing the young queen in the split?

2. Shake the bees out and divide the resources among some small splits?

3. Other options?

Thanks
Shane
 

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"Other options?"
I'm in the mood to trifle with wintering nucs, so I would shake all the bees out 150' from the hive and add a frame of brood and a few nurse bees. Otherwise, if I were feeling active, I would shake the bees 150' feet away, wait a day, and combine the ones that made it back with another hive. If I were feeling more sedentary, I would shake the bees out right in front of a strong hive and let the bouncers take care of the laying workers.
 

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Believe it or not that queen cell is probably a drone. I have heard on this forum that bees will as a last ditch effort attempt to make a queen from a laying worker egg. I have successfully requeened a laying worker hive but it's not easy. Shaking the bees out is way less work and less stressful on the beekeeper. Good luck. Let us know how it all plays out.
 

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are you sure you have a laying worker. How do you know the hatched out queen failed. a new queen will
A. lay eggs on the side or corner of the cell.
B. lay multiple eggs in a cell,

How long has it bees since the last queen hatched? are there capped brood cells in the hive? are they all drone Caps?

I personally would like more particulars on the hive before I would make a decision.

Not challenging your diagnosis, Just want to be sure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
are you sure you have a laying worker. How do you know the hatched out queen failed. a new queen will
A. lay eggs on the side or corner of the cell.
B. lay multiple eggs in a cell,

How long has it bees since the last queen hatched? are there capped brood cells in the hive? are they all drone Caps?

I personally would like more particulars on the hive before I would make a decision.

Not challenging your diagnosis, Just want to be sure.
Thanks Tenbears and others,

After the original queen cell failed to produce a laying queen in an acceptable time, I added a queen cell from another hive. This hatched out, the bees still have not torn it down and the cell is still visible.

The brood is all drone brood. Multiple eggs in each cell. I am not sure how long it has been since the second cell hatched out. A rough guess based on some other queens we reared is a week to two weeks ago.

I will go through the nuc again today to make sure there is not a queen.

Shane
 
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