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When a laying worker is active in a colony, do the cappings on the cells appear any different than in a normal colony? I made up 3 nucs a few weeks ago. Two have raised queens and are doing well. One was slow, but now has what appears to be normally capped worker and drone cells. I see larvae but my eyesight is not good enough to see any eggs. But, I cannot find a queen in this colony. Does the presence of a drone larva in a worker cell cause the cap to have a domed appearance or will it still be flat?
 

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Yes, the laying worker eggs will become drones and will have the domed cappings. If you have both regular worker cappings and drone cappings you should have a laying queen.
 

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Drone brood in worker comb has an appearance similar to a collection of bullets, with protruding cell caps. Laying workers often lay multiple eggs in worker cells, cells of pollen, and even queen cell cups.

When there is a mixture of worker and drone brood, in worker comb, then it is most likely you have a queen (a failing or poorly mated one), rather than laying workers. Laying workers can only rarely lay diploid eggs that will grow into other workers or queens (see thelytoky). If all the brood in the worker cells is drone brood, then you are most likely to have laying workers, though you might have a drone-laying queen (a queen, for whatever reason, unable to lay fertilized eggs).
 
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