Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Has anybody heard of the Layens hive? I built one yesterday - copied it from a friend. Later in the week, I hope to fill it with a couple of frames from one of his hives (Will this work?).

I'm new to this, but the hive seems to be fairly common in Catalonia (North East Spain) where I live.

The frames are (internally) 12" wide x 14" deep and the hive seems to have the simplicity of a TBH. I don't know if it's already been done, but I'm planning to make a langstroth nuc and a half to use as a super and to get me onto standard frames.

There is a pic on this page - no.3 of 7

The bee hole is midway on the long side. Mine will take 12 x 1.5" frames. I'll have to make them myself. I might try some TBH style t-bars or just empty unwired frames. It's all a learning process.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Has anybody heard of the Layens hive? I built one yesterday - copied it from a friend. Later in the week, I hope to fill it with a couple of frames from one of his hives (Will this work?).

I'm new to this, but the hive seems to be fairly common in Catalonia (North East Spain) where I live.

The frames are (internally) 12" wide x 14" deep and the hive seems to have the simplicity of a TBH. I don't know if it's already been done, but I'm planning to make a langstroth nuc and a half to use as a super and to get me onto standard frames.

There is a pic on this page - no.3 of 7

The bee hole is midway on the long side. Mine will take 12 x 1.5" frames. I'll have to make them myself. I might try some TBH style t-bars or just empty unwired frames. It's all a learning process.
Hey, there!

Almost the complete spanish beekeeping activity is based on Layens beehives. They're Hardy and easy to use bet at the same time dirty and limited. However, should you need more info, please be so kind as to contact us and we'll be happy to assist (we're located in Malaga)
Regards
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,431 Posts
There are many types of bee hive, bees can make a hive in any cavity that is closed with a small opening.

The Langstroth and similar hives are much easier for the BEEKEEPER, not necessairly the bees, allowing one to remove honey without disturbing the brood nest, easily exchange frames between hives, and the sizes used make the frames easy to handle.

Bees actually prefer entrances to be more or less in the center of the hive rather than the top or bottom, and select cylindrical spaces about ten gallons in size (roughly two Langstroth "deep" hive bodies), so a square hive with 12" deep frames with an entrance hole in the middle of one side would suit them quite well.

I like being able to pull shallow boxes of honey off, though -- they are quite heavy enough for me, have enough honey in them to give good yield with minimal work, and prevent too much semi-finished honey.

I would keep using whatever the local system is, though -- if you need to exchange frames, it's nice if they fit your hives....

One other thing to note is that many of the "old fashioned" hives were not intended for removing honey from an active hive, they were developed from skeps, where the bees were killed to collect the honey. Many of them will not adapt well to removing "supers" for honey collection, and I would avoid them. I'm not killing hives to collect honey, around here that would greatly limit production. We have a heavy spring flow and not much the rest of the year, and starting new hives every would result in very little honey in most locations.

Peter
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,425 Posts
Welcome to Beesource! I wouldn't expect Leo to be responding as this is a very old thread and he doesn't seem to have been active after posting this.

I see from your profile that you are a commercial beekeeper. Do you use this type of hive in your operation? I've read that your government is encouraging beekeepers to use Dadant or Langstroth hives.

Wayne
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top