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I have a number of dead out hives that did not survive the winter and many frames with last years honey. Normally the bees consume the honey and I have mostly clean frames. Any thoughts on what to do with these frames as I will not be needing them perhaps until fall if at all. I will only be using one deep this year and the bees don't seem to be interested as they have better sources of pollen now.
 

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It is highly unlikely they will extract. I tried a few recently. The bees will only use it as a last resort and are not keen to uncap it. It helps if you uncap it but it then tends to weep and drip onto frames below or run out the bottom board.

I have an outside tap that I can access my hot water and if you uncap the comb, place the frames upright with top bar down and you can spray with a gentle spray nozzle and flush the honey out.

Normal tank setting of about 135 F. will not damage the comb. Not something to do if you have a large number of them.
 

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When I take frames from the brood nest of colonies that are becoming congested I put them in the freezer, immediately. If they go in liquid they will thaw into liquid, so if they haven't crystallized in the hive you should be fine. I have done this from one Spring to the next. Granted, the honey around here doesn't crystallize quickly.

Alex
 

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When I take frames from the brood nest of colonies that are becoming congested I put them in the freezer, immediately. If they go in liquid they will thaw into liquid, so if they haven't crystallized in the hive you should be fine. I have done this from one Spring to the next. Granted, the honey around here doesn't crystallize quickly.

Alex
I agree. If I have any honey in frames left from the winter or deadouts, or cutout honey, I put the whole medium (or container) into my upright freezer. I put each medium inside a contractor bag, seal it completely and stack them up in my garage. Instead of feeding syrup, I feed these for winter stores. Bees have no issues with this at all.
 

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Seal it, freeze it and feed later it like Sox and Alex said.

I don’t have the freezer space so I would have to leave it outside a couple hundred feet from the hives and let the bees have it back. You can uncap it to make it quicker. Once clean, stack it with ice crystals and when you need to decongest a brood chamber, you’ve got the drawn comb to do so.

Good luck!
 

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I have a number of dead out hives that did not survive the winter and many frames with last years honey. Normally the bees consume the honey and I have mostly clean frames. Any thoughts on what to do with these frames as I will not be needing them perhaps until fall if at all. I will only be using one deep this year and the bees don't seem to be interested as they have better sources of pollen now.
I am in the same place as you are. I had 6 Dead outs with about 60 deep frames of honey. I am going to do 3 things. 1) make splits and after queen is mated, place 6 frames of honey in the split for winter stores. Frame 1 an 10 in box 1 and frame 1,2,9,10 in box 2. IE let the bees guard it. 2) save a few in case I catch a late swarm. like 20, I can place 10 deep frames of honey on an August swarm and they will have enough to make the winter. 3) in the past I have done this and it works. nadir a strong hive with the deep box of full honey on the bottom board. The bees do not like honey under the brood nest and will set about moving it to above the nest. I look at it as night time work. the honey will get feathered into the supers on top to be extracted and by fall the bottom box will be mostly empty. Functionally equal to the "spring box swap" I will typically select my best young queen to do this to, then in the spring,I have an extra Deep in a great place for a split. If you have an extractor you can do 3) modified. Hold the frame up to the light and "determine" if it is set up or Liquid. Pick 10 that are liquid, take your time and extract. like 3 slow spins per side, once down to 75% or more of the honey out of the comb. then nadir with the mostly extracted frames, they will clean them up faster uncapped and partly empty. you can extract close to a quart a frame that way, worth the mess. maybe some one at the bee club will lend you a small 2 frame for the project. Go slow so the frames do not blow out.
 
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