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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I hope someone can clear this up for me. I understand that a warre hive is a set and more or less forget it way of bee keeping, and you judge what is going on at the entrance to judge how the hive is doing, also you add to the bottom rather then the top .

Ok now the lang, you open and go through frames to check on the hive and add more to the top to expand, here is where i am confused, why do you add to the bottom in a warre and not in a lang ? also why can't you just monitor a lang rather then open it up ? . what makes bees build down in one and up in another ?

thank you
 

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I guess the simplest way to put it is...Lang is convenient for beekeepers and Warre is convenient for bees...or so the theory goes. This was really helpful when I was looking at them

http://www.bjornapiaries.com/warrehivebeekeeping.html

I've heard some keepers say bees think up and I've heard beekeepers say bees think down. They might have a preference, but they will ultimately build with what space you give them, be it underneath or above or horizontal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks gus979 that did help some. i just started with 2 hives this year maybe i will add boxes on top of one and under the other and see what happens. as far as just trying to watch them outside i am seeing them bring in pollen and see young bees doing their first flights so i guess thats one good thing. still like to know more info on the whole thing though
 

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i will add boxes on top of one and under the other and see what happens.
If you keep adding boxes under, the bees have no choice except to go down. Problem is, when you harvest you have to remove everything to get to the bottom. If you continually add to the bottom, most often, at some point, the brood nest will be moved down, and excess honey will be stored in the top. This may take some time tho, perhaps a season or more.

If you are only inspecting from outside, it is easy to miss certain things, like, robbing vrs a thriving colony, like, small hive beetles taking over a colony. like, a failing queen.

To each his own. some like it one way, others another way.

cchoganjr
 

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My rule of thumb: add beneath (nadir) in their first year, super the next year. From what I have experienced in Warré hives is, that the broodnest doesn't move anywhere unless you have a continious nectar flow throughout the season. One or two heavy flows per season don't push the broodnest down. So for most locations the original Warré management, only nadiring won't work too good.

Regular insepcting of the inside of the broodnest is needed in order to prevent avoidable problems. You can do this in a Warré with no problems. Just take off box by box, flip each box over like you turn a skep upside down, inspect from below. Use a little smoke to drive the bees back down into the comb. Use a small torch or headlamp to look at the combs, you also can bend the combs to the sides to get a better view. With a knife you can cut out pieces of broodcomb to check for eggs or diseases.

For inspections you can cut the sides of the comb and lift the comb out by holding the topbar. Rule of thumb: don't cut honey combs with bees on it. Brood combs are light and not turning into a mess when you cut it.

More or less, the hive is fully inspectable and you can do all the things modern bee management requires. In fixed combs that is. No worries. It is an old craft to keep bees in fixed combs and most modern beekeepers just don't know how to do it. Once you learned it, you outpace frame beekeepers. (Because you work more by the boxes than by frames.)
 
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