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Discussion Starter #1
I have a landing boards that are permanent and at about 33 degree angle to horizontal.
When snow comes i am sure it is gonna accumulate there and block entrance of the beehive.

How to protect beehive/landing boards from snow drifts so the bees have air to breathe?
 

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You can place a board so the entrace and landing boards are protected from wind and snow but the bees still able to go out sideways.
 

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Provide an upper entrance also. We often see most of the stacks under snow. Dont forget mouse guards.
 

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Upper entrance and let the bottom be blocked. I preach a hole bored under the handhold in the top brood box. Bees prefer one hole in nest. With just that one the bees ventilate very well.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Provide an upper entrance also. We often see most of the stacks under snow. Dont forget mouse guards.
Will the upper entrance be a source of heat escape? They always talk about insulating your top.

Also, will it provide enough air for all the bees?
 

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You can place a board so the entrace and landing boards are protected from wind and snow but the bees still able to go out sideways.
Although snow is an infrequent visitor here, I also use snow boards - their principal function being to keep bright sunlight reflecting from off the snow and into the hive entrance, fooling the bees and luring them outside ... often to their death.
LJ
 

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Will the upper entrance be a source of heat escape? They always talk about insulating your top.

Also, will it provide enough air for all the bees?
If it works for VanceG and myself where we see 35 -40 below F. it will work for you. Yes there will be some heat loss that will take out excess moisture and provide the necessary oxygen/CO2 exchange. The bees often propolize the hole down to 1/2 inch or smaller. Drill it 3/4" or if rectangular something around 3/8 by 1"
 

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Will the upper entrance be a source of heat escape? They always talk about insulating your top.

Also, will it provide enough air for all the bees?
Michael Bush:

Top Entrances

I think this is essential to reducing condensation in my climate. It was not necessary when I was in Western Nebraska which is a much drier climate. It doesn't have to be a large top entrance, just a small one will do. The notch that comes on the notched inner covers is fine. This also provides a way for the bees to exit for cleansing flights on warm snowy days when the bottom entrance (which I don't have) would be blocked with snow. I have only top entrances and no bottom entrances.
 

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I lean plastic political signs up over the front entrance area when storms are expected. That keeps the snow from building up. I am not so much worried about the bees in this case, as keeping the wooden ware dry and providing a wind baffle.

My upper entrances have three-piece cardboard and wood shim wind baffles over them as well.

Nancy
 

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How much snow are we talking about here? a few inches? The heat from a healthy hive is enough to soon melt a bit of snow in front of the entrance. Last year it took less than 2 days for a nice tunnel to melt up from the bottom entrance in 5 inches of snow. like a chimney, on the (flat, not angled) landing board.
full disclosure, I do keep upper entrances on all my hives, so snow on the landing board does not bother me in the slightest.

If you're talking feet of snow, then upper entrances are almost required.

OTH, there are some beeks here that don't mind going out to sweep the snow from the bottom entrances of their hives after a heavy snow. It gives them a chance to check in on them.
 
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