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Was a victim of the 80% die off at this site. Don't say starvation, that is about 80 pounds of honey left. Ring one up for the small cell advocates, the small cell sister hive lives on, but two regular size small cell hives at this site crashed. These frames are the size of two 9 1/8" frames.

How should I progress from here? I was thinking of abandoning the Gargantua hives as they die because - there is no way I can extract the frames other than cut and crush. I could throw another swarm in and run it as foundation-less. Or, I can convert the box to a two queen hive with six frames on each side with common supers. Would this work? Or, I could saw the box down to fit my 11 1/4" frames which I can extract. What is your suggestion? Link to the whole album:

http://s156.photobucket.com/albums/t7/odfrank/Garantuan BroodChambers/





 

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I've thought about doing much the same just as a curiosity, a strange experiment. My thought was to see if such a deep brood nest would take the place of two deeps for overwintering (it should, undoubtedly) and maybe provide better winter success because of the continuous comb in the brood next.

I'd be curious to see what would happen if you cut the comb out and go foundationless in Gargantua. Maybe I'll get a couple set up that way here and we can compare how they design their own comb in such deep frames.
 

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I'm on an unreliable 3g connection, so I can't easily look at the whole album.

Why not put this on top of another colony, let the bees expand into it, and then split?

If you've decided that you don't want LC, cut the comb out of the frames with the least honey and put them in the center. Place it above (or below) a SC colony. When you have fresh comb and young brood in there, do a walk away queenless split. You can cut out and rotate the other LC combs as you can. Crush and strain, leave the combs out for robbing, or wait unitl a dearth and start removing the LC comb as you can.

Not a perfect solution, but not a perfect set of parameters you have laid out either :)

deknow
 

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Bigger is not better, especially for overwintering. Even when not winter, it's hard for the bees to keep the brood from getting chilled in a huge box.
 

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Maybe, although I've been experimenting with overwintering bees in less than two deeps (or the equivalent of that), and it seems to take some extra pains to make such methods successful. I would argue that bigger is better for overwintering to a point. But this gargantuan hive is the same size as two deeps. I typically overwinter my bees in two deeps. The volume is the same, the difference would be no gaps between frames.

Bees that have excessive brood and have trouble covering it will have trouble in two standard deeps or in one gargantuan hive like this.
 
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