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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just had an idea and was curious on thoughts. If you had a hive beetle infestation and wanted to eliminate them without killing all of your bees, what about taking
a can of compressed air and inspecting the hives? I tried this on some beetles at home. It only takes a small squirt of frozen CO2 on the larger black beetle and it is dead.
On larvae this would be even more devastating since the larvae have no exoskeleton yet. Just curious what your thoughts are. I would think doing this every time
you pull frames would be good. What parts of the hive do the beetles prefer? I would imagine honey and pollen. In that case, there would be little threat
to destroying brood. Also, CO2 has no lasting effects. Kill the beetle and larvae; let the bees removes them.
 

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I think it will also kill bees if missused - I'm pretty sure I have seen videos where they knocked them out with CO2 so they could scoop them into mating nucs. If it will kill beetles while only making the bees take a nap you could be onto something.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If you use it outside on the honey comb which is where the hive beetles lay their eggs, you would be safe. The temperature inversion on a warm day could be almost 150 degrees. That kills quickly. If you take the frames out one by one and kill them, I think it would work. Out in the open, the risk to the bees would be minimal if at all.
 

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While you have a frame out checking and spraying it two more beetles fly into the hive.
Good Luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Way to be positive! Doing something is better than doing nothing. If it gives the bees a reason to stay and not fly away, I say do it. Plus, a good friend of mine told me the key is to actually work the bees. If you do this, the SHB can't get established.
 

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It certainly seems to have potential but only time will tell. I'd be very curious about your results; I may just dust off my can of Freeze-Mist and experiment myself. It's always good to hear some thinking from outside the box.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Like I said, I tried it in beetles in the wood piles. It even works on wood roaches. It literally talks about a second burst and they are done. The only problems I could see would be the bitter agent added to some cans and the cost. I know for the big beetles, a straight shot of about two seconds kills them instantly. I am thinking about other solutions as well. I wonder about painting the bottom board different colors. Black would become super hot, but would it affect bees one way and beetles another? Would installing a solar powered light at the entrance keep he beetles away? They supposedly don't like light. Light up the entrance.
 

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Opening a hive to do an inspection, and moving frames or other essential activities is enough of a disturbance to the bees. I suggest that instead of keeping the hive open to zap a few shb's it would be more efficient and keep the hive open a shorter amount of time to install shb traps of some sort.

Two summers ago I had several frames slimed by SHB's. Immediately in went the beetle blasters, one or 2 to a box.

Last summer I did not use a single trap, but made sure that wherever stores or brood frames had shb's there also were a lot of bees. As long as there were many bees the shb's are kept in control. I did remove a frame that had stores and shb's but few bees. Last summer not a single frame got slimed. To make a long story short, keeping bees a little crowded keeps any shb's on the run, and does not allow a moderate presence to get out of control.
 

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I'd think a 9'' square of signboard laid on the top bars of the top box would be way easier and probably more effective. Each time you open the hive grab it and what? throw it in a pail of water, or place it on a hive cover that is free of bees. When the 'buggers' run out, you could quickly spray them. Or smash them with thumb or hive tool.:D

Working the bees helps, someone says. I disagree. Each time you break open the hive the beetles all escape from wherever they are corralled and the bees have to do another roundup. The trouble comes when there aren't enough bees to successfully keep the beetles under control.
 
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