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Now that the kids are getting bigger (4 and 5) they are having more of their friends over to play. Just last weekend there were 6 or 8 kids here for a birthday party.

The best spot in the yard for my 9 colonies is about 120' behind (and the entrances facing) the swingset.

So far, there have been no problems and I'd like to keep it that way. I'm wondering what, if anything, I could/should do when kids come over. While a fence is planned, I'm wondering if parents should be told we have bees here. What if some kid get's stung and has a bad reaction? Should the parents sign a "waiver" giving us permission to use an Epi-Pen on their child?

Maybe I'm overthinking this, but I know how sue-happy people can be, and I surely don't want anything bad to happen to any of the little friends my kids invite over.
 

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For what's it worth I would be real hesitent in giving a strange kid an epipen even with permission. After all they are perscription plus there are different doses for child or adult. I think you could be in bigger trouble administering something like that. I would let the parents know you have bees and let them decide what action they want to take with their children.
Regards
Pete
 

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For what's it worth I would be real hesitent in giving a strange kid an epipen even with permission. After all they are perscription plus there are different doses for child or adult.
We recently had an ER trauma doctor come do a talk at our club meeting about anaphylaxis... signs, treatment, etc.

Talking about epinephrine (Epipen is actually a specific brand)... while there is a different dosage from child to adult, there are essentially no side affects from taking a slight 'overdose' of epinephrine. IE... you'd have to use a heck of a lot of epipens all at once to do any sort of physical harm to your body.

Give the potential outcomes of someone having an anaphylaxis reaction... in the doctors words...
-an adult dose for a child is not dangerous; it won't make things any worse... so if they're having a reaction to the sting, an adult dose isn't going to make the reaction worse.
-an expired pen is better than no pen. Given the choice of no shot vs. expired shot... use the expired shot.

And not sure about the US... but in Canada, you can buy emergency epinephrine 'pens' at the pharmacy without a perscription. However, if you have a perscription, you will probably pay less because you can use medical/health insurance to cover some of the cost. The visiting doctor actually went to a pharmacy before the presentation and bought one 'over the counter'.

Also... one of the other makers of epinephrine 'pens' makes a two-ended shot... with two doses. In case you need more than one. And IIRC, it was essentially the same price.

This is the problem with a sue-happy society... danged if ya do... danged if ya don't. Sue you cause you let a bee sting their child... sue you cause you gave them an epinephrine shot...
 

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When the grand kids, twin 3 year olds and 1 infant, come to play, I prop a sheet of plywood up against a tree about 6 - 8 feet in front of the hive. This makes the bees take a high approach and escape route above the yard.

At 150 feet I would not be overly concerned but a good faith measure will go a long way with the other parents. I would tell them and the kids about the hive and set a boundary.
 

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I believe that under the law, you owe a certain degree of care to your guests. At the very least, you should inform the parents that you have bees on your property.

May I offer an alternative?

Simply put screen closures on your hives for the day of the party. Temporary solution for a temporary problem. You would also have taken due diligence under the law to protect your guests.
 

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keep your eyes open (classified ads, trader papers,etc) for someone taking down an old "privacy" (semi-solid panels) fence or someone who bought too many, or "damaged" panels at a big-box store. get 4, make a square enclosure. the kiddies wont be TOO tempted to bother the bees and it will force the flight path upwards. good luck,mike
 

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I've got a 5 and a 10 year old girl and boy (respectively). Their friends are over all the time. I make sure the parents know about the bees and then tell the kids about them and to leave them alone. "You can watch them but come from the side and don't get too close." This has worked well for 4 years with no incidents. The bees face away from the swing set and are behind a couple trees. Their flight path is over a creek away from where the kids play.
 

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And not sure about the US... but in Canada, you can buy emergency epinephrine 'pens' at the pharmacy without a perscription. However, if you have a perscription, you will probably pay less because you can use medical/health insurance to cover some of the cost. The visiting doctor actually went to a pharmacy before the presentation and bought one 'over the counter'.
Fortunetly. you don't live in NY state our laws are quite strict on drugs and yes epipen and such are persciption only. I just got mine from a Dr. NY laws would hang you if you administered something that was not for that person let alone the liability in the courts if something went wrong. Your a hero if it works but if it goes wrong forget it! They will own everything you ever worked for plus prison time!
 

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There is a place in Nebraska that allows you to drop of your kids up to the age 17 I think. I think it's a "safe haven" law. Then you won't have to worry about it. :)
 

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My experience this year of introducing kids to bees has covered a range of reactions. Some kids (parents too) think it's cool to do, and others think that you're crazy and putting the children at risk. Awareness of how to deal with severe reactions is important since you don't always know who may have a violent reaction. I have been trained to use epi-pens. What to do if any one gets stung should be discussed with anyone around the bees before it happens to keep the situation manageable (I have a basic first aide kit handy with epi-pen, Benedril, band-aides, baking soda, bottled water and some chemical cold packs - I'm also am close to a school nurse and have a local medical facilities phone number posted on the first aide kit.)

I let the kids move towards the hives based on their comfort level, and as already mentioned, we stay off to the sides or rear of the hives.

I let experience and reasonableness guide the situation. Children that I know have allergic reactions don't visit the hives unless accompanied by a parent, and their involvement is considerably limited since a sting would be counter productive to their learning.

This year I was able to introduce about 60 children to active hives with out one of them getting stung.

Returning to the original question: Let people know that you have bees, educate them - most are curious); take precautions to be responsible and prudent, and then everyone will be more comfortable and happy.
follow the link to see some pictures of some students around the bees. Enjoy. Paul

http://s460.photobucket.com/albums/qq324/pbuhler/Students around bees 2010/
 

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For what's it worth I would be real hesitent in giving a strange kid an epipen even with permission.
Sure cause it's not like someone having true anaphaylaxis will die without the shot.... Oh wait yes it is, THEY WILL DIE. your not using the shot to treat hives or a rash, it is being used because the tounge is swelling up and breathing stops.
 

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The "two-ended", two shots in one syringe mentioned by dtompsett is called the Ana Kit in the US.
It is not as intuitive to inject as a standard epi pen. You really need to look at it, read the directions and figure out how to twist the plunger for the two doses before you have an emergent need to use it. Someone unfamiliar with it may be easily flustered IMO.
 

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There is a place in Nebraska that allows you to drop of your kids up to the age 17 I think. I think it's a "safe haven" law. Then you won't have to worry about it
they modified that law.

So many losers were crossing state lines to dump their kids off that it became overwhelming.

Gonna have to give your kids the Chicago ride somewhere else. ;)
 
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