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Discussion Starter #1
I read in the January Edition of ABJ about Kefuss operation. There are some pictures of what is called "Kefuss Hybrid Cloake Board". I'd like to learn more about them and how they differ from regual cloake boards.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Jack,
It seems you are right, modification is to reduce footprint. Heres the response I got from John:

Dear Jens,

The cover is made to set a 5 frame deep frame nuc over 2 ten frame
deep supers. When the entrance to the hive at the top is closed off
and the bottom entrance opened below, the same amount of bees flying
out that would be spread over a 10 frame super are compacted onto 5
frames which is very good for queen rearing. Another advantage is that
it is easier to lift off the 5 frame super when looking for brood to
move up above the cloake board.

Yours truly,
John Kefuss
 

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Can someone help me out. On closing the top entrance does he mean closing the outside entrance or the entrance below from the deeps? In opening the bottom entrance what would draw 10 frames of bees to the nuc on top? Brood and the cells? Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I was wondering the same but I think he means closing the board between the queen-right two boxes below and the five-frame box on top. Bees exiting from the now opened rear bottom will return to the entrance on front and become part of the temporary queen-less five frame box on top. That box will be given grafted cells and become packed with bees. After two-three days the board is removed and the bottom rear entance closed.

Check out the article on Cloake boards, it has some nice illustrations:
http://www.leedsbeekeepers.org.uk/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=225
 

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I interpreted the article to mean that he found having only a nuc in the cell area above the cloake board (vs. a standard deep) gave him larger cells. I am curious as to why that would be. Seems like you would be able to have more bees to support the cells in a larger box, not a smaller. Anyone heard of other people building cells in a nuc above the cloake board?
 

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I understand the importance of young bee density. But I don't understand how a smaller box accomplishes this better. I can fill a normal deep with more bees to tend the same amount of cells than I can pack into a nuc. I must be missing something.:s
 

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I believe what is trying to be said about nurse bee density is not the total quantity of bees in a box but what amounts to the number of nurses per cubic inch so to speak. As I understand it, you want to keep more bees in a smaller space when queen rearing so that the cells get visited more frequently thereby feeding and tending the queen larvae more abundantly.

Tim
 
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