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Discussion Starter #1
I am a rookie/hobbiest and have one (1) year old hive near Memphis TN.

If I can stand and watch plentiful, content and healthy Bees within 3-4 feet, I think this is a reliable indicator that the Queen is OK and I need not mess around with examining frames and squinting to see tiny tiny brood cells. I will make sure they have plenty of room. If they want to make a new queen that is ok with me. Let the dominant queen rule!

After the honey flow...I will equally split the hive in half, medicate both and take the new hive to the Missouri Ozarks.

Is this folly? What say you all?
 

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Rob s; as you become more experienced with the bee`s behavior you will find they may look ok but you do need to check thing in the hive , how the queem is laying , drood pattern,pollen, storesof honey,parasite and other abnormality. good luck with your bees rock
 

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> I think this is a reliable indicator that the Queen is OK and I need not mess around with examining frames and squinting to see tiny tiny brood cells. I will make sure they have plenty of room. If they want to make a new queen that is ok with me. Let the dominant queen rule!

Maybe they are doing well. How do you know they aren't hopelessly queenless? If they are, they can't make one. I'd look for some brood. You don't have to find the queen, but you should make sure they have brood.
 

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I have seen a lot of activity at the hive entrance and then find out that the queen was missing or laying patchy brood or drones, by checking I had plenty of time to re-queen and keep the hive strong enough to survive the winter or give ma a decent honey crop. As far as splits do it just before the flow or plan on feeding feeding feeding.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for all the good comments. I think if they need a queen, they can make one. I'm hoping for the "national average" honey crop this year
-about 40 lbs. I'll split afterward and feed feed feed. They will have the rest of the year to get ready for next winter.

As long as their disposition remains good...they have a good queen. Maybe I can get away with checking/smoking them every two weeks instead of every week like last year.
 
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