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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My brother and I own a metal fabrication and Semi tractor Truck/Trailer service and repair center. I live 3 1/2 miles from our shop. I have a large colony of Purple Martins on our farm where I live. I want to raise nucs for my own self sufficiency and possibly to sell. I doubt that raising queens and Purple Martins go too good together. I have considered putting nucs and a couple of hives at our shop. We have 2 1/2 acres there and there are a few places to tuck a hive or two, or several nucs, BUT the only good places would be fairly close to the property lines.

We have a chiropractors office on one side, residential housing on the other and government housing behind us. I don't want to interfere with the neighbors being able to mow their yards without getting stung. If I put the hives, say 20 feet from the property line and face the hives towards the center of our property, would that be a safe distance to keep peace with the neighbors?

I could put the hives and nucs on our other farm, but it is across town and wouldn't be as convenient to check.

Opinions please.
 

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The following guidelines are used in Florida and developed from years of experience and research.

The placement of honey bee colonies on non-agricultural private lands must agree to and adhere to the following stipulations:
A. When a colony is situated within 15 feet of a property line, the beekeeper must establish and maintain a flyway barrier at least 6 feet in height consisting of a solid wall, fence, dense vegetation or combination thereof that is parallel to the property line and extends beyond the colony in each direction.
B. All properties, or portions thereof, where the honey bee colonies are located must be fenced, or have an equivalent barrier to prevent access, and have a gated controlled entrance to help prevent unintended disturbance of the colonies.
C. No honey bee colonies may be placed on public lands including schools, parks, and other similar venues except by special permit letter issued by the Director of the Division of Plant Industry and written consent of the property owner.
2. Honey bee colony densities on non-agricultural private land are limited to the following property size to colony ratios:
A. One quarter acre or less tract size - 3 colonies. Colony numbers may be increased up to six colonies as a swarm control measure for not more than a 60 day period of time.
B. More than one-quarter acre, but less than one-half acre tract size - 6 colonies. Colony numbers may be increased up to 12 colonies as a swarm control measure for not more than a 60 day period of time.
C. More than one-half acre, but less than one acre tract size - 10 colonies. Colony numbers may
be increased up to 20 colonies as a swarm control measure for not more than a 60 day period
of time.
D. One acre up to two and a half acres - 15 colonies. Colony numbers may be increased up to 30
colonies as a swarm control measure for not more than a 60 day period of time.
E. Two and a half to five acres - 25 colonies. Colony numbers may be increased up to 50
colonies as a swarm control measure for not more than a 60 day period of time.
F. Five up to 10 acres – 50 colonies. Colony numbers may be increased up to 100 colonies as a
swarm control measure for not more than a 60 day period of time.
G. Ten or more acres – 100 colonies. The number of colonies shall be unlimited provided all
colonies are at least 150 feet from property lines.
3. Beekeepers must provide a convenient source of water on the property that is available to the bees at
all times so that the bees do not congregate at unintended water sources.
4. Beekeepers must visually inspect all honey bee colonies a minimum of once a month to assure
reasonable colony health including adequate food and colony strength. If upon inspection honey
bees appear to be overly aggressive the beekeeper shall contact their assigned apiary inspector for an
assessment.
5. Re-queen collected swarms, new colonies and maintain colonies with queens or queen cells from
EHB queen producer(s).
6. Practice reasonable swarm prevention techniques as referenced in University of Florida’s Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences extension document “Swarm Control for Managed Beehives”, ENY
160, published November 2012.
7. Do not place apiaries within 150 feet of tethered or confined animals or public places where people
frequent. (Examples - day care centers, schools, parks, parking lots, etc.)
8. Do not place colonies in an area that will impede ingress or egress by emergency personnel to
entrances to properties and buildings.
9. Deed restrictions and covenants that prohibit or restrict the allowance for managed honey bee
colonies within their established jurisdictions take precedence and as a result supersede the authority
and requirements set forth in Chapter 586 Florida Statutes and Rule Chapter 5B-54, Florida
Administrative Code.
 

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i'd put them at the shop. throw up some temp fencing, or paint them green
if your neighbors dont know about them its better in the long run.
people get stung by a wasp and blame it on a bee
i'd back them up to goverment land as the first option even if that's means being in the shade.
i'm next to a rock quarry and savor not having neighbors.
all the best
 

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i would consider making splits this year and try keeping them in the home yard. if you get queens mated then those good bees of yours might be smarter than the martins and you won't have to worry about it. if you don't get mated queens then you could combine your splits back to their parent hives and come up with your plan b. it would be good to know, because all of your colonies will have to raise a new queen from time to time.

i've got mockingbirds that stalk my hives during queen mating season. i'll find a colony here and there from which the queen has disappeared, but most of them tend to make it back from mating.
 

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I agree with keeping them out of sight, people can be fickle and will blame every sting on your bees. I keep my hives out in the country behind my house, the neighbors don't know I have them and I plan to keep it that way.
 

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Consider fencing. I keep my hives in my side yard, about 12 feet from the property line, in a residential area. Behind them (about 5 feet away) is the house, to the left and front of them (about 8 and 12 feet away) are solid fences about 6.5' high, and a shed is to the right. That way the bees are overhead by the time they leave the property. I provide water for them, too, and thank goodness none of my neighbors have a pool.

My neighbors, who all know the hives are there (because I told them), have let me know that they can't even tell.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The closest house to our business has a privacy fence on the back. If I put nucs at the shop, I think I will put them behind the privacy fence, and put up cattle panels around the hives.
 

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The closest house to our business has a privacy fence on the back. If I put nucs at the shop, I think I will put them behind the privacy fence, and put up cattle panels around the hives.
I would buy the 8ft privacy panels at the local building supply super store instead of cattle panels. They will not slow down the bee's, and it gets the bee's above head level for flight.

Another benefit is no one will know they are there. What if your insurance company sends out an inspector to reinspect your home? In all probability they would cancel your homeowners insurance policy if they are seen and the company does not allow them.
 

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When I first read the title I read it as "land mines". Was very curious why you had land mines, but I did read an article about using bees to find land mines.
 
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