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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Henry VIII that is...

<chagrin header on>
Boy do I feel like a chump!

I had an "expert" take a look.
The perceived swarm cells seem to be more like "supercedure" cells. They are at the bottom, but there are definate supercedure cells in the middle of the comb, they were small enough on Saturday that I saw them but it didn't register.

Musta killed her about 1 1/2 weeks ago somehow. Out of 30-40,000 bees what are the odds.

What do I do now? The cell I saw today was capped. They weren't capped on Saturday.

Should I let them do their thing, or should I try to get a new queen as soon as possible?

Thanks for the help!

-Rick <chagrin header off>
 

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Instead of Henry, how about just "kook".

Let em do what is natural. They may not take a caged queen at this time anyways. If it was earlier in the process, I'd say go for a queen as your going to miss some of the honey flow as your bee population will go slightly down. You may want to swap some brood frames if another hive is available.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Lenny??? Am I too young and missing something?

Thanks for the replies. I suspected that that would be the best route. I'm just glad I thought about it before I destroyed all of my "swarm cells".


I am trying to get more "observational" or "hands on" experience by working more with the elderly gentleman that got me started.

I now see the wisdom in taking out a storage frame first to get room!! It makes more sense when you actually see it done.

Live and learn....

thanks again
-rick
 

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Local feral survivors in eight frame medium boxes.
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>I now see the wisdom in taking out a storage frame first to get room!! It makes more sense when you actually see it done.

It is also less likely to destroy a queen cell etc.

Back to the queen cells. I'm pretty hesitant to destroy them unless I'm sure I understand why they are there. I think destroying queen cells by the beekeeper, accidently or on purpose, is a leading cause of queenlessness in hives.

Emergency cells tend to be (no gaurantees) all over (bottom middle etc.) Swarm cells tend to be (no gaurantees here either) hanging off the bottom bar.

Before I destroy any queen cells I want to know if they are superceding (which I almost always let them do unless I think I know why and I really don't want to lose the reigning queen) or swarming (which I almost always "help" them with by doing a split or two) or they are queenless (in which case I REALY don't want to destroy the queen cells because they need a queen).

After I'm sure I know why, I try to decide what I want to do with the queen cells.

But my first instinct is always to leave them, not destroy them.

I don't know how many times, though I've been doing a careful examination and found a queen cell only after I had already destroyed it. Usually because it was connected to the frame next door or the frame below. Frustrating.
 

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<<Lenny???>>

"Of Mice and Men", he's a BIG guy who doesn't know his own strength. He likes to pet soft animals, but ends up petting too hard. A heartbreaking classic.

[This message has been edited by dcross (edited April 21, 2004).]
 

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The thought that comes to my mind is that you may not have enough drones yet to fully mate a queen. Whether they supercede or not, I'd plan on requeening later. Of course you'll have time to assess what you've got by then.

Dickm
 
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