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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm building two hives with an interior depth of 14.5" and interior top-length of 23.75". In order to avoid almost certain comb-collapse, I am making half-frames that extends approximately 7" below the top bar. This is an experiment at trying to minimize the surface area per volume. The whole hive only needs to be 33" long in order to have the same volume as a 10 frame lang with 3 deeps. Where I live, the temperature usually exceeds 110 F one or two days each year but it also drops below -10 F at least once every four years. I am just curious on what the consensus of collapse is.
 

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I guess you can tell us in a year or so. ;)

I wouldn't want to manipulate combs that large.

It will be interesting to see what the bees do with the space.
 

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I guess you can tell us in a year or so. ;)

I wouldn't want to manipulate combs that large.

It will be interesting to see what the bees do with the space.
 

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With combs that deep and temps that high I would suggest you have very good insulation above the topbars and probably a gap to allow air flow above. Best of luck.

ps. you could place a dowel down from the centre of the top bar to provide additional attachment since your bars are so wide.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It will be interesting to see what the bees do with the space.
I did want to see how they would react to that space. I routed comb guides in an attempt to avoid curving on the ends. This could very easily end up as a disaster. On the other hand it might speed up inspection with a full hive. Experimenting is always so much fun.:scratch:
 

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This is only year 2 for me but I wanted to tell you about ONE incident. I have a "Golden Mean" which is short and has largish combs compared to most TBs. We had 3 months with 100 degree weather,many days, and I didn't insulate my hive I just put a shade canopy over it!!! The hive is sheltered quite well from wind though so I could get away with that.:)
My only comb accident was lifting a comb with big area of drone on the Bottom,but not the top half, and it tore off when I lifted it out and nicked an edge on the side of my hive. It was early so the comb wasn't "sun-heat" soft,just 1st year new-comb soft. The nick started a tear like a zipper and the heavy drone/bottom-third fell in a blink taking some honey and workers with it. Thinking about that makes me like what August C says about that dowel helping your experiment! ;)
 

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Is this more like a long hive or more like a KTBH? The reason I ask is because if I where going to go this route I would make it more like a long hive with square frames. The frames would be a lot easier to deal with (no weird angles) and you would manage it more like a foundationless lang than a top bar.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
It is more like a Kenya. I'll try to post pictures later today to show what the half-frames look like. The dowel ideal made me think that I might want to use some wire to support the center strip of the frame. mike hive.jpg
 
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