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From reading 100's of posts/papers/studies/etc. I came away with the distinct impression that starting end of July and into August MITE loads are peaking on otherwise untreated bees. This would seem to be the time to Powder/Dowda the girls, Hose 'em with Sucrocide, FGMO a few times in-between the other treatments, Cull Drone, set up the ApiLife Var, Get out the Formic Pads, reach for the Oxalic Pipe. None of that hard chemical Apistan or worse check-mite. No this little nest in regressed for the three middle broodnest frames at 4.8 and still working on the others. Girls are getting fed 1:1 to help with comb building and they're drawing up those empty frames up quick! I can see a mite here of there, but not often. Sticky Board from SBB shows 28 for 24hrs. Take action!.?.!.?!?!?!??!? :confused:
 

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There are only 3 fully drawn frames and they're still working on the rest? This must be a package. When did you start them? It's getting late. By this time I'd expect the first deep to be fully drawn and the second to be well under way. How much brood is there?

Under normal circumstances, a 24 hour drop of 28 mites would get my attention in a real hurry and I'd be putting my treatment strategy into effect but I wouldn't be in a panic. In the situation you describe with so little drawn comb, there can't be all that much brood in the hive. To have a drop like that, the mites must be really piling into what brood there is available for them to breed in, likely multiple mites in a cell. I'd be looking for symptoms of heavy mite infestation more typical of higher drops- bees with shrunken abdomens in particular, brood being uncapped, perhaps even bees with shriveled wings i.e., early symptoms of PMS. Mites are like mice- if you see one on a bee, there are LOTS that you can't see. Have you opened any capped drone brood? I would, in a hurry. If you find 10% of your drone brood infested, I'd get busy yesterday. Your hive may be at greater risk than your 24 hour drop counts suggest. The risk in particular now and as summer progresses is weakened, lethargic, demoralized bees that lack the initiative to be productive. Foraging suffers, house keeping suffers, and hygenic behavior suffers. As the end of summer approaches and the symptoms of PMS begin to assert themselves, the bees being raised to take the hive through the winter are heavily infested with mites and as a result, weakened and shorter lived. Under these circumstances, the hive stands little chance a surviving if the situation can't be reversed quickly.

I'd also forget the FGMO, it's not effective at controlling heavy mite infestations.

Open some drone brood. Let us know what you find.
 

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Do Apistan it is quick and easy for a new beekeeper. The other stuff is too slow or too harsh on the queen. If you have Apistan resistant mites, you won't know until you try. Odds are you don't.

I doubt this colony will make it through the winter.

[ July 18, 2006, 07:03 AM: Message edited by: magnet-man ]
 

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>starting end of July and into August MITE loads are peaking . . .
>This would seem to be the time to (treat) . . .

This is a poor time to START treating using powder sugar, Suckercide, or oils of any kind. These "treatment" only kill a few mites at a time, and are best utilized as "prevention".
If you dont have mites
they work great!

If your colony is from a package in and you only have 3 fully drawn frames AND a 24-hr mite count of 28. YOU HAVE A LOT OF MITES. My guess is your hive is filling up w/ mites that your bees are collecting while they rob out a nearby mite-infested hive.

Your ONLY hope is to consider using a treatment that kills A LOT of mites NOW.
 

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You need to be more complete in your history and current status of the hive. Specifically, was the hive started from a package this spring, how many frames are completely drawn out, of these how many have brood, have you been monitoring drops throughtout the season (if so, what numbers have you been seeing). These data will help us better guide you towards an effective treatment strategy.
 
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