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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just got a call that a city earth day event being set up for the 4 surrounding counties,wants us to speak and put on an hour long presentation about bee,beekeeping and she specified the current problems concerning our European honey bees.

We are really excited but are also very nervous. If any one can point me in the direction to find wonderful presentations to watch please do so. But, as most of us I'm sure....I'm a bit obsessed and have probably seen or read it hahaha.

If any one would like to share materials,literature or anything please do. We live in a heavily rural and agricultural part of the Midwest and if I can help any local people understand we need their help...it would be wonderful. We really want to represent our beekeeping community well.

I'm planning on doing a demonstration with a top bar hive as well. Because I think it is important for the backyarder and small family gardeners to realize its possible to have a couple hives without heavy lifting or being intrusive to the bees. We have a lot of older folks in our area and tbh's are. Perfect match for them.



Just thought I'd share. We are pretty excited.

(Not too bad for promoting our products as well :)
 

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Search for Marla Spivak on youtube. She has a great video about 15 minutes long. Also, the documentary "More than Honey" (available on Amazon) has some great material. Both of these describe the multiple challenges that honeybees face.
 

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Eric Mader, et.al. The Xerces Society Guide, Attracting Native Pollinators, Protecting North America’s Bees and Butterflies. Storey Publishing, 2011.

I thought this is well reasoned, positive, and balanced. Second the Marla Spivak talk. Check the discussions here on More than Honey -- it has some mistakes.

google and find the Keith Delaplane discussion of how much of our food comes from honey bee pollination.
 

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Just got a call that a city earth day event being set up for the 4 surrounding counties,wants us to speak and put on an hour long presentation about bee,beekeeping and she specified the current problems concerning our European honey bees.

We are really excited but are also very nervous.

.........I think it is important for the backyarder and small family gardeners to realize its possible to have a couple hives without heavy lifting or being intrusive to the bees. We have a lot of older folks in our area and tbh's are. Perfect match for them.


(Not too bad for promoting our products as well :)
CONGRATULATIONS! I would be nervous and excited as well. But nervous is GOOD!

An hour is a LONG time to be speaking/presenting. You may want to have several pauses as you move from one subject to another, allowing questions or comments and hands-on. Also be careful with powerpoint, as that is a very successful tool in turning your audience into zombies. Hands-on in the context of your subject is very effective.

I would suggest using an 8-frame medium for demonstrating a Langstroth Hive, as a means for enticing the curious into getting started in the hobby. That way you could point out that even when LOADED the weight is (don't quote me on this), about 50 pounds. That is a BIG deal with us older folks, and would be an alternative to the topbar hive, should some in your audience be less enthusiastic about going that way.

At the Maryland State Fair, several years ago, the State Bee Inspector was giving a 15-or so minute talk on raising honey bees. He demonstrated the use of an extractor. During Q&A a little girl asked "Do you ever get stung?" His reply: "Do carpenters ever get splinters?"

Enough of my rambling. Go for it!

Phil
 

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Ok, let's assume that you are very knowledgable in the field. An hour is not very long. Don't try to copy other peoples type of talk, be yourself. Make a good outline with topics and sub-topics, on paper, that you can reference. That will keep you on track when folks ask questions in the middle of a subject. Make sure that you explain the terminology. Most-non bee keepers don't know what a frame, or bottom board, or inner cover, etc. is. Encourage them to ask questions as you go along or at the end of each topic. That alone could take 1/2 of your time. Be prepared to answer questions on pesticides used for bee health and pesticides used in agriculture. On earth day especially, you may get questions on GMO, pesticides, and who knows what else. Pass gracefully on giving opinions on questions that scientists can't yet answer. Mostly, have fun and let your audience have fun too.
 

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Tommysnare, where is this meeting going to be? Since I am fairly local to you, I might be able to make the meeting. Go for it!!!!!!!!!!!!! Dale
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Tommysnare, where is this meeting going to be? Since I am fairly local to you, I might be able to make the meeting. Go for it!!!!!!!!!!!!! Dale
hey hey !

ita going to be in Coffeyville. she said it will be a few days AFTER earth day because of soo many things happening on earth day and her late planning. come by it would be cool to meet up.

Hows ur bees doing btw ? this winter is getting to be a bummer :(
 

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How's your Bee's doing? I have 3 hives and we checked them last Sat. and they are all 3 alive and well with honey and sugar. How's yours doing. Were you able to save that swarm that you picked up South of Neodesha last year?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
How's your Bee's doing? I have 3 hives and we checked them last Sat. and they are all 3 alive and well with honey and sugar. How's yours doing. Were you able to save that swarm that you picked up South of Neodesha last year?
sounds like good news over in ur yard ! we have lost a few due to this winter....kind of a bumout :( but the rest seem to be doing well. a little light now but we are open feeding on warmer days until spring gets here. we think we are gonna have a great season this year with how the winter was and all the moisture we got late this winter. just soo long as we dont get a horrible freeze snap in spring like last year....just as the blooms were coming in.

i believe that swarm from over there is gonna make it. it had some problems for a bit after getting it. they absconded once and then they balled the queen. a really tough time getting them to take. but when the new queen got laying they seemed to take off just in time to gear up for winter. lets see how they do this year.
 
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