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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My hives have loads of drones and lots of callow bees (newly emerged). And it ain't even March!
 

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My hives have loads of drones and lots of callow bees (newly emerged). And it ain't even March!
I opened one of my 5 frame overwintered nucs this week end and it was packed with eggs and larvae. I had to add another nuc deep box.
 

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I opened one of my 5 frame overwintered nucs this week end and it was packed with eggs and larvae. I had to add another nuc deep box.
Georgia and an "overwintered" comment....... sorry ...I had to chuckle at that....it was -14◘F this morning and there is 3' of snow on the ground here.....
You Southern beeks don't know what winter is....:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Georgia and an "overwintered" comment....... sorry ...I had to chuckle at that....it was -14◘F this morning and there is 3' of snow on the ground here.....
You Southern beeks don't know what winter is....
Here...the bees produce some brood most of the winter and therefore the mite population grows year round. Add to that the fact that small hive beetles also overwinter in our hives in great numbers....ready to start at the first break in winter.
I keep a yard in the mountains of NC at an elevation of 3500ft. The overwinter temps run about the same as Ohio. Not Wisconsin but still somewhat north. Rare to see more than a couple of shb. They consume less honey overwinter. And they require one less mite treatment each season.

Just sayin'....we all have different challenges. It ain't easy anywhere.
 

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Meanwhile here in Vermont I have snow on the ground and it may hit 20 today if we are lucky.
But yes, we all have different challenges. I would hate to deal with some of your problems down south. J
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
So how is that when compared to other years? At what point would you normally see your hives in this state?
I would say that we are two weeks ahead of ‘normal’. Ordinarily we would have some worker brood beginning mid to late January and by now we would be seeing a few workers emerging. At the same time, we would see some capped drone brood but not any significant number of emerged drones.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Agree on the two weeks ahead. While not busting out with bees yet, there is a lot of capped brood in many of my hives. Those hives will be double their population in just a week or two. One thing to consider though is that I feed early. Fed early last year too.
 
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