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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've had some deep frames with some capped honey stored in my porch for a bit. Well, the yellow jackets found their way into my porch (it's enclosed) and now it's a free-for-all of yellow jackets in there. I've duct taped all the entrances to the porch that I see, but I think they're still getting in.

Anyway, I looked at some frames and there's larvae in them. In one picture I've scraped off the bottom right to expose the larvae. In the other it looks like capped larvae. Are yellow jackets somehow laying in there? Or is it wax moth?
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Yellow jackets will not lay into your frames - 100%.
However, even wax moth will not lay eggs directly into honey - possible around the honey, but not directly into honey.
Whatever you pictured - looks to me as if it is just hardened white honey, NOT larvae of any kind.
So that.
OR make/post better pictures if want any useful feedback (for sure zoom in) and you may just find your own answers while doing that..
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yellow jackets will not lay into your frames - 100%.
However, even wax moth will not lay eggs directly into honey - possible around the honey, but not directly into honey.
Whatever you pictured - looks to me as if it is just hardened white honey, NOT larvae of any kind.
So that.
OR make/post better pictures if want any useful feedback (for sure zoom in) and you may just find your own answers while doing that..
Honey turns white like that? Huh, never knew that. With my original pics it's easy to zoom into it, but I guess the resolution isn't so good after uploading. It looks almost like a bunch of small rice pieces or something when I dig a white section out. Unfortunately I purposely set off a robbing frenzy after leaving the unused hive equipment outside to clean up all my frames, so I won't be able to get a better picture anytime soon. Thanks for the reply.
 

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Thanks. Is this something the bees would eat if I put back into the hive? I was going to scrape off all the big sections that looked like that, but now I don't think it's necessary.
Only if they are desperate! I watch bees in the spring flying it out of the hive and air dropping it. Repeated spraying it with water may help. You cant extract it either.
 

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Thanks. Is this something the bees would eat if I put back into the hive? I was going to scrape off all the big sections that looked like that, but now I don't think it's necessary.
Use them now or keep them as emergency feed for winter/spring.
Scrape/liberally spray with water/serve (repeat the periodic spray as needed).
If used now, you want this honey to be reprocessed by the bees - they will (if you handle them as extracted frames needing the drying - do spray water).
In winter, just scrape and lay such frame directly over the top bars (works just as dry sugar).

OR send my way - I will gladly takes ALL those frames - no fuss. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
So there was a pile of fine wax and solid white sugar dust at the bottom of the deep from letting the bees rob out. I grabbed a few pinchfuls and it was like candy. Nice and chewy and sweet. Then I remembered that this was from deep frames treated multiple times with several chemicals.
 
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