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I'm a second year beek. We overwintered our two hives and planned to add two more hives. We wanted to try nucs this year so we ordered 2 and picked them up on April 17th. I also picked up a nuc for my mentor. As my wife and I were walking away with the nucs, the gentleman said, "Oh, by the way, these may have small hive bettles in them. You might want to put some lime down around the hives to kill the larvae. They shouldn't be a problem here in Kentucky because our soil is too hard." I called my mentor who wasn't happy. We decided to isolated the nucs in a new apiary I set up this spring. When we installed the hives we placed oil bettle traps and left them alone for 10 days. I put my 2 nucs in 10 frame boxes and my mentor put his in a 5 frame nuc. When I inspected the hives there were no bettles in the traps but I did find a bettle walking on top of a frame in the nuc. So my questions are?
1) Is it normal practice to sell infected/infested nucs?
2) Does lime on the ground under and around your hives help eliminate SHB?
3) How long do you leave a SHB trap in?

Thank you in advance for you time and advice?
 

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Unfortunately, nowadays most hives have at least a small population of hive beetles. The thing is, is that a strong hive will keep the beetles in their place and their populations in check. It has been my experience that hive beetles, while pesky, never reach large enough populations to overtake a hive unless the bees are suffering from some other disease or have a mite problem. A few hive beetles will be just fine if your hive is strong. Guard Star (TM) is the approved ground spray that prevents the larvae from pupating. In short, no this is not uncommon, but it is nothing I would worry too much about.
 
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