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Discussion Starter #1
I have 20+ frames full of honey that was left from a couple deadouts from this Spring. Some are leaking quite a bit and it is runnier than ripe honey. I'm not sure if it is fermented or what...the cells that are uncapped are not bubbling, which I thought would happen if fermented. I think most of the leaking is from cells that are near the bottom and got scraped open while handling. My biggest concern is the fact that it seems runnier than typical honey.

Can I give this to the bees in the fall to help them get through winter, or should I get rid of it?

Thanks in advance for the advice!

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Honey is hygroscopic, right? If you damaged the comb and exposed the honey, it will absorb water and become runnier than you think it should be.

I would have no qualms about feeding it back to your other hives on that basis...no problems with anything like AFB or EFB in those deadouts, right?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Knisely.

No Fouldbrood. They both made it through the frigid cold winter and I lost them both in March. I think my problem was condensation. I'm going to try putting quilt boxes on top this fall with wood chips in them. I heard that works good for keeping down the dripping condensation.

The worst part is just trying to keep them stored without creating a sloppy mess...
 

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it is getting to be the time of year at our latitude when wax moths are getting active. if you have not sprayed them with BT them you will have a problem storing them for certain. Either give them to the bees, that is the best place to store honey you intend to feed back anyway. or extract, label as feed and feed them back a your leisure.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I thought wax moths went after brood comb. I have them sealed tight on top, bottom and I taped the seams just to be safe. I don't think there's a way for moths to get in. I am going chemical free route so I don't want to spray them.
 

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I thought wax moths went after brood comb. I have them sealed tight on top, bottom and I taped the seams just to be safe. I don't think there's a way for moths to get in. I am going chemical free route so I don't want to spray them.
Love it every time I hear those words.

If everyone would grow a pair and go more natural instead of babying their bees, we would all have a higher percentage of survivor colonies!!
 

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Love it every time I hear those words.

If everyone would grow a pair and go more natural instead of babying their bees, we would all have a higher percentage of survivor colonies!!
Really? care to explain how you have come to this conclusion?
Maybe you could start a new thread so as not to hijack this one.
 

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I have them sealed tight on top, bottom and I taped the seams just to be safe. I don't think there's a way for moths to get in.
You be surprised how tight a crack wax moth can get thru, especially in their larval stage. And who is to say some eggs weren't there when you taped everything tight.

I suggest you stand these supers up on end and let your other hives rob it. That or set each super on top of a hive. The bees will tell you whether it is any good to them or not.
 

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The first frame looked good to me. Just go through the box and see if there are creepy crawling worms. Can you extract? I would if you could and then throw the frames on the hive for the bees to clean up. Fermented honey smells like sweet beer. That is the best I can describe it. It is good for you if you like it.
 
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