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This hive has recently swarmed and upon post swarm inspection I found no queen and these two cells. Now from my readings swarm cells are on the bottom of frames but these are a the top. So which cells could these be? Can a hive still throw after swarms days later? Now in the picture one is un capped but it has since been capped. Should I worry or let them be? I don't want them to swarm again as this hive has swarmed twice (Thursday and Friday);

http://i272.photobucket.com/albums/jj200/simtech08/Bees/IMG_1604.jpg
 

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If the queen cells are on the bottom of the frame they are usually swarm. If the queen cells are in the middle of the frame they are usually supercedure. Since the queen does not normally intend to be replaced by a younger, perkier girl, she will not tolerate queen cells in the middle of the frame any more than your wife will tolerate a cheerleader handing you a towel in the shower.
 

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AmericasBeekeeper's view aligns with what I've heard.

I'd let them do what they see fit and prep some gear to house a swarm.

Bees go about their business without concern for our goals. Experience the challenge on their terms.
 

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They built those queen cells AFTER they swarmed !! They are now waiting for a new queen to hatch. Most or all of the brood will have hatched before the new queen is beginning to lay.
 

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Those are likely swarm cells. Swarm cells most commonly occur at the bottom of the frames but when the comb has been damaged or interrupted they will often be produced in the resulting gap, wherever it is on the frame. That appears....to my old eyes...to be the case with yours. If the hive has already swarmed those cells are likely mature and should emerge soon.
 

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The old queen leaves with the swarm. She leaves queen cells behind and this gives the old hive it's new queen. There are several to make sure one makes it. The first queen to emerge, reacting to sound from the unhatched queens, stings them through the side of the cell. The bees tear them down. You have a virgin queen in the hive as evidenced by the nice neat way she exited. A few days to harden her cuticle and a week to mate and settle in. Then eggs and, if a bird doesn't eat her, you have a new colony with a young queen. Be patient. While supercedure cells are said to be in the middle of the frame, these depend from the top bar in the manner of swarm cells.

dickm
 

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They built those queen cells AFTER they swarmed !! They are now waiting for a new queen to hatch. .
Those cells are definately swarm cells. They were made before the hive swarmed and 1 has already hatched(maybe both).
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
1 has already hatched(maybe both).
Actually the open one was just recently capped. This hive has already swarmed twice. I got the first swarm and the second left before I could get back with a box. So are you telling me they are going to swarm again?!? Oh man if they do, there will be nothing left of this hive I fear.
 

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I think I misspoke. It's hard to tell by the picture but it looked like the cell on the top of the pic was hatched. If it was just being capped then maybe you don't have a virgin running around. Are there other swarm cells? When a queen hatches there will be a little flap hanging from the opening or it will be a darkened thin rim around the bottom of the cell.
 

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How many cells do you have? If you have a couple then make the most of it and split the hive and cut (carefully and keep them upright and don't jostle them) the queen cells out. You can slap some 3 frame nuc boxes together or make some mini mating nucs and place the cells in the top of a frame of honey. Just put your thumb into the honey so the cell fits in it and allow room at the bottom so she can emerge. Depending on the size boxes you use make sure you have the right amount of bees. This time of year you shouldn't need to feed and you should have to worry much about stocking the box(es) with too many bees. Give it a shot. I got 2 fat queens this year from supercedure cells built in good, queenright hives. Both are laying great and are as large as any queens I've ever had. Yeah I got lucky but it was offset by some not so great luck. That is beekeeping for sure-some good things and some not so good. Capitalize on what you can and maybe it will be a year where you will be working for next years "banner honey crop"
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Well today it looks like they swarmed(again, 3rd time). I was at work and my in laws called to tell me. My father in law and my wife rounded them up. So I possibly could have another and don't understand why. There is not that many bees left and Im at my hive limit now. I don't want more than 5 and I have five. I went from two hives to 5 in a matter of 2 weeks. Sure it is nice, but I don't understand why so many swarms spaced out like this. Oh well!!!! The crazy thing is, is that this hive was really weak last year due to queen problems and wintered over in a single deep, now they are/were booming! I should have split that one when I split my other hive. Life lessons!

However this got me to thinking about commercial bee keepers. If they are in it for honey production are you telling me that they get into a 1000 deeps and do swarm management? Wow if they do, or do they just let them swarm?
 

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However this got me to thinking about commercial bee keepers. If they are in it for honey production are you telling me that they get into a 1000 deeps and do swarm management? Wow if they do, or do they just let them swarm?
I have seen large comm beeks who let them "do their own thing" and have seen many swarms hanging in trees near their beeyards. Most try to get into the hives and super to provide plenty of space but its tough to keep up with thousands of hives. We run 100 hives and despite our attention we still experience a few swarms from our hives that have plenty of space, plenty of supers, and double brood boxes. Bottom line provide them space to lay and store but those girls have a mind of their own and despite our best efforts to sway them they are going to do it THEIR way. good luck. :)
 
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