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It's not a queen cell, just some wacky comb that they sometimes build on plastic foundation. Scrape it off & straighten the comb before putting the frame back in the super.
 

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I don't want to say "badly" drawn comb, bees will use any space they can in a hive. When I see this type of comb, and yes I've had it, is usually the results of too much space between frames. Whenever you work your hives, just before you close up, make sure you take your hive tool and pry your fames towards the center from both side. This will close the gaps between frame and provide proper bee space. All frame ears should be touching-do not spread the frames to equalize spaces across the hive box-leave the space between the outer frames and hive box open-this will ventilate the hive and provide space for movement to upper boxes for your foragers.
 

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Also don't use 9 frames in a 10 frame honey super to get thicker comb until you have the comb drawn first at normal depth with 10 frames.
 

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Italian breed, 1 colony (my first ever), 10-frame hive
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I don't want to say "badly" drawn comb, bees will use any space they can in a hive. When I see this type of comb, and yes I've had it, is usually the results of too much space between frames. Whenever you work your hives, just before you close up, make sure you take your hive tool and pry your fames towards the center from both side. This will close the gaps between frame and provide proper bee space. All frame ears should be touching-do not spread the frames to equalize spaces across the hive box-leave the space between the outer frames and hive box open-this will ventilate the hive and provide space for movement to upper boxes for your foragers.
This is helpful advice for a new beekeeper like me. Thank you.
 
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