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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

Still filling out my brood box but spotted this on the two outer frames this morning and I’m not too sure what it is. It’s been raining a heck of a lot where I am and even thought it could be mould.
Would love input from a more experienced apiarist :)
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I don't see any issues...

Are you referring to the darker comb? Comb turns dark over time as the bees walk all over it and get it dirty. The pupae casings in the cells the queen lays in also turn black, this is why you'll see dark around where the queen has laid vs where she has not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply, the darker comb doesn’t worry me. I was referring to what looks like dark sunken in cells in the first two photos (I thought sunken in cells was a bad thing but I could be remembering wrong?) and then the lighter stuff that looks almost like mould in photos 3 & 4.
 

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Thanks for the reply, the darker comb doesn’t worry me. I was referring to what looks like dark sunken in cells in the first two photos (I thought sunken in cells was a bad thing but I could be remembering wrong?) and then the lighter stuff that looks almost like mould in photos 3 & 4.
Thanks for the reply, the darker comb doesn’t worry me. I was referring to what looks like dark sunken in cells in the first two photos (I thought sunken in cells was a bad thing but I could be remembering wrong?) and then the lighter stuff that looks almost like mould in photos 3 & 4.
Ahh. Those sunken in cells are partially filled cells with pollen. It's when you have brood cells that start showing cracks and sinking that you have serious problems.
Mold issues are usually taken care of by the bees.
Also did you shake the bees off those frames? Are the number of bees low?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ahh. Those sunken in cells are partially filled cells with pollen. It's when you have brood cells that start showing cracks and sinking that you have serious problems.
Mold issues are usually taken care of by the bees.
Also did you shake the bees off those frames? Are the number of bees low?
Ahh. Those sunken in cells are partially filled cells with pollen. It's when you have brood cells that start showing cracks and sinking that you have serious problems.
Mold issues are usually taken care of by the bees.
Also did you shake the bees off those frames? Are the number of bees low?
Thank you. So should I just leave them to it?
I did brush them off to get a photo but we’re still building up the brood box and they haven’t filled all the frames yet. We’ve had about a solid month of rain which is why I’m guessing we haven’t seen much growth since the last inspection and the adding of more frames. Just been trying to help them out with a sugary solution close by.
 

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Even if it is raining they should still be building up if they have food. Do you see eggs, larvae and capped brood?
If you set-up an exterior feeding station they may not be getting much benefit if other bees are around. Worse case scenario, your weak hive could become the target of robbers if the feeding station is too "near-by."

Alex

Edit; It is very easy to let them starve during this time of year.
 

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I see you have an Aussi flag. Is that where your hives are located? If so then your bees are going to be getting ready for winter. That would change the brood, numbers and comb building habits.
 

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I just glanced at the flag, I thought it was Great Britain's. If it is Australian, that would change change whether they are building up or winding down.

Alex
 

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Hi,

Still filling out my brood box but spotted this on the two outer frames this morning and I’m not too sure what it is. It’s been raining a heck of a lot where I am and even thought it could be mould.
Would love input from a more experienced apiarist :) View attachment 62806 View attachment 62807 View attachment 62808 View attachment 62809
Some of that in the corners looks like wax moth damage the bees are repairing. The cells surrounding the brood nest looks like left over pollen they have sealed over for some reason. Were these frames damaged by wax moth larvae?
I also see some SHB scurrying about.

Alex
 

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I also see some SHB scurrying about.
That's the only thing I see as an issue. The comb looks just fine. Like already mentioned the sunken cell is just pollen. It's in the brood nest you don't want to see sunken cells. Mold is also never an issue, if there were any, bees can easily clean it right up.
 

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I just glanced at the flag, I thought it was Great Britain's. If it is Australian, that would change change whether they are building up or winding down.

Alex
Same here. Then got a second look. I bet Oldtimer would know where they are at as far as prepping for winter. And if their winters are much concern. If it gets cold at all in the winter there, that hive might be in trouble.
Isnt Oldtimer from N.Z.?
 

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That's the only thing I see as an issue. The comb looks just fine. Like already mentioned the sunken cell is just pollen. It's in the brood nest you don't want to see sunken cells. Mold is also never an issue, if there were any, bees can easily clean it right up.
I thought the corners of some frames looked like there may be remnants of webs.

Alex
 

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Maybe a wax moth larvae got in there but looks cleaned up now. Bees will repair the rest.
That's what got me to wondering about the population in the hive. Did this happen to the brood comb in the hive or was it put in this way and the bees are currently cleaning it.
You're probably right, it may be nothing. Maybe the OP will let us know.

Alex
 

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Hi Andri-Alert, I agree with the others, the cells you are concerned about are not an issue, from a disease perspective anyway. I see similar in my hives sometimes, typically it is when there are not enough bees to clean the combs properly, it's been raining or damp, and some manky old pollen has rotted down.

There may be other cause for concern in your hive though. I see zero honey stores, and it looks like the bees are dropping in number where at this time there should still be good numbers of bees in the hive.

Are you able to post some more pics, showing some brood? Plus a pic or two showing the overall number of bees in the hive would be good too. Plus, let's know where in Australia you are. With that info we can talk you through anything else you might need to do to ensure your bees get through winter in good shape.
 

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We don't have SHB in my country so I have no experience. But question for you guys who know, is that an issue, or just a random beetle?
 

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Australia has them
So how is it that Varroa destructer starts in the Indonesia islands WAYYYYYYYYYY long time ago. And the U.S. gets varroa and Australia doesnt? Yea............. Australias government has worked so far. The U.S. needs to fire all of our import people. We need to adapt Australias programs. Because what our system is doing is not working. The U.S. people running things are actually doing quite the opposite of protecting our resources. I dont think we have had a bigger explosion of invasive species of everything in our history. Total and complete failure.
Keep on your officials down under. Its not a coincidence. And its not by accident.
 
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