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In one of the many threads here where swarms are being discussed, someone mentioned placing an empty nuc in the bee yard so if a hive does swarm, there's a chance it will swarm directly into the nuc. This seems like a very good idea to me, and i'm wondering how common a practice it is, how often it actually works, and if there's any down side to doing it? If lemongrass oil is placed in the nuc, i'm worried that it could actually encourage a swarm, rather than simply act as a "soft place for them to land" if the swarm instinct has already been triggered by one thing or another.

I hope i'm making sense. It's hotter than Satan's daughters here, and i can't think straight. :)

Cheers!
 

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I always keep empty nucs or hives in my bee yards, but alas, without any positive results. So, I would say the downside for me is a feeling of annual failure.

Yet, hope springs eternal, which, I believe, is what keeps all beekeepers going.

Wayne
 

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I would place the empty nuc up to 100 yards away if possible if you want to catch a swarm, though I once had them move into an empty hive sitting adjacent to the hive that swarmed.
 

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Your success rate filling up empty equipment will go up dramatically if you place your "swarm traps" in places that would be very inconvenient to have a swarm. Examples In bed of pickup, in open garage, by back door of pool patio. You don't even need to check them your spouse will usually notice that you've caught something.
 

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This flew in to one of my apiaries today, from somewhere else. I think that, like queens mating far from their home, swarms also like to fly away from their home, to spread their race far and wide. I catch a lot at my main apiary, but they always come flying in from away in the distance. If you want to catch your own swarms, place your baits a few blocks away. This one was the size of an orange, and first landed in a tree on the the side of the house. They prefered the entrance at the warped lid over the front door.

 

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odfrank, did you put anything inside this nuc hive to attract the swarm?
 

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If you have nuc boxes you have to store them somewhere, so why not. Chances are that bees won't swarm into them. I have stacks of supers here at home and swarms always go to the trees for a while and then move on. Rarely do they move into the stored supers, but it happens. So don't get your hope up too high.

I would be concerned about wax moth though. If a swarm is going to go into your nuc box, does it have to have combs in it before the swarm moves in?
 

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> there's a chance it will swarm directly into the nuc.

No downside. But not likely. And they NEVER swarm DIRECTLY to the nuc, they would bivouac on some limb first and then most likely go somewhere a quarter mile away.
 
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