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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a couple of vent boxes above my brood boxes and below my inner covers to create enough space to put syrup bags.

One hive isn't trying to fill the space at all and the other was building comb in the extra space until I started putting crumpled newspaper in that void.

It seems to be working well, but I'm curioius if it's actually a good or bad idea. The bees are working to chew it up and remove it and I wonder if that is more or less energy than it would take for them to build the extra comb they had been building.
 

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Lot of work for them to chew the paper and then carry it out of the hive. If that's the way you are doing it, let them build the burr comb. When you are done feeding, smoke them down, scrap off the burr comb and get their bee space right again. Ever thought of placing the bags over the inner cover hole instead of under the inner cover?
 

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Actually you don't even have to buy a top feeder. If you have an empty honey super and a mason jar you can make an excellent feeder that you don't have to worry it will drip, pour, flood your hive out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Because the bags have been working great. It's easy and cheap, no drowned bees, right on the top bars so it's close to the bees. And from what i understand people have issues with top feeders and burr comb as well so.....

Regardless, I'm learning and trying to figure out the most efficient wat to do things without first spending a lot of money on equipment that might just end up on a shelf.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I was thinking of building one of those that fit over the inner cover and the jars are on it. My thing about that one is wondering how to keep good ventialtion with that set up. I thought about lifting the inner cover at all four corners with nickels or popcycle sticks. That amount of space wouldn't allow any bees to pass through it i don't believe, but I don't know if they would try to propolize the crack.
 

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I just cut a hole in the top. Put in a mason jar. Then I make a cover for the hole to use as a plug when there is no jar on top. I also have a second set of covers that have no hole but, most have the cover. With a brick ontop it works just fine. I also like seeing the jars so I know when to refill them.
 

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:thumbsup:Feed Rim

I have been using feed rims and the work great!
I made mine with a 3/4" rim.
I am thinking about making a few rims that are 1" thick so that i can fill the bags with more syrup.
The rims are used to feed pollen supplement or pollen patties.
Ernie
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
:thumbsup:Feed Rim

I have been using feed rims and the work great!
I made mine with a 3/4" rim.
I am thinking about making a few rims that are 1" thick so that i can fill the bags with more syrup.
The rims are used to feed pollen supplement or pollen patties.
Ernie
Are you saying that you just made a 3/4 inch tall "super" to house the bag? That's basically what I'm doing but I'm using a ventilation super that Kelley's sells. It's over 2 inches though and I think that's why they are building the extra comb.

I like the ventilation though. How can I continue to get the good ventilation with a "feeder rim"?
 

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In my vast experience in beekeeping (6 weeks ;) I was under the impression that, depending on the local, a standard langstroth hive with a screened bottom and an open "notch" in the inner cover will provide OK ventilation for all but the hottest of summer months (and I live in SE MO). If ventilation is a concern during the hot months, I could just slightly prop open the outer cover with a stick. I seem to have read that ventilation is maybe more critical in the winter, due to condensation. If ventilation is already an issue in Cincy this time of year, should I be concerned as well?

Apologies for the slight thread creep.

Sam
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
In my vast experience in beekeeping (6 weeks ;) I was under the impression that, depending on the local, a standard langstroth hive with a screened bottom and an open "notch" in the inner cover will provide OK ventilation for all but the hottest of summer months (and I live in SE MO). If ventilation is a concern during the hot months, I could just slightly prop open the outer cover with a stick. I seem to have read that ventilation is maybe more critical in the winter, due to condensation. If ventilation is already an issue in Cincy this time of year, should I be concerned as well?

Apologies for the slight thread creep.

Sam
Don't apologize. No, ventilation isn't an "issue" yet heree. I just see the logic in giving them an upper vent system of some sort. The roof on every home should have one. I'm just trying to figure out a good method.

I think that I'm going to build a 3/4"-1" rim as was mentioned earlier placed on my brood box(encapsulating the bag) with the inner cover over that. I'm gooing to screen off the opening in the inner cover and then place my screened ventilation box sandwiched between that and the outer cover.

I think by doing that, I can minimize the space above the frames and syrup bag while keeping plenty of airflow up top while keeping the bees out of the "attic"
 

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I like the idea, and I see the logic (less wing fanning to cool the hive equals more work someplace more profitable).

I have been using baggies as well, and so far they seem the easiest to use. I do have one plastic hive top feeder that seemed like a Godsend until I had to remove a half-full one to do an inspection. I have since stapled the feeder's flange to a mountian feeder rim to keep it stabilized and easier to handle. . .well see if that helps.

I like the idea of screening off the inner lid hole. I don't think I'll use a bee escape, so I don't see any disadvantage of doing this, and a lot of advantages based on Throttlebender's concept.
 

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I made my rim out of 1x4 and drilled a hole on both sides and one hole on each end at an angle (weather purposes) and then cut square pieces of #8 mesh to patch the hole. Great ventilation and no robbing from the top! Just another idea!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I made my rim out of 1x4 and drilled a hole on both sides and one hole on each end at an angle (weather purposes) and then cut square pieces of #8 mesh to patch the hole. Great ventilation and no robbing from the top! Just another idea!!
That's what the ventilation box that I have on currently is like only it's 2.5" tall and has two screen covered holes on each side.

The problem I'm having is that it's too tall and allows for quite a bit of comb to be built in that space if I allow it.

So, I'm going to make a shorter one that is solid and then move the screened one above the inner cover(also screening the oval opening) to create a vented attic of sorts.

AND, I just realized that I don't have to track down any #8 hardware cloth because I can take it from the bee packages I just realized are still in the garage:D
 
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