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A friend of mine has a HOT hive. They are unbearably hot. He has 30 or so hives and the others are okay. This hive is bad. They will seek you out 200 feet from the hive and jump on you. Not one or two, but dozens or more. I've not been in the hive with them, but have seen the bees in action. Truthfully, I don't know how long it's been since they've been in that hive. They had to move it from the pasture behind their house to a piece of property they own out in the boondocks because the bees would come get them while they mowed their yard which was a couple hundred feet from the hive. They hunt on the property where they put the hive and their son told me that the bees ran him off during deer season, in January. They said the last time they worked the hive they had on 2 pairs of coveralls with clothes under them, veils and leather gloves. They said they had "two hundred" bees on each hand trying to sting them and could barely see out of their veils.

I don't guess that being active during cold weather is a trait of AHB's and I've never been in a hive of AHB's so I don't really know how HOT they act. I don't know where they got their bees from, but I do know they haven't bought any bees in years and have never bought any Russian bees.

They have tried to requeen the hive but those attempts have failed.

I suggested that they send some off for testing to see if they might be AHB's. They laughed and said they wouldh't open the hive to try and get bees out of it, but invited me to. They said they would stand off at a distance and video...... I thought I might wait until a nice cool 30 degree day to catch some of those bees. :D
 

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Pedigree has never mattered to me. Manageable is the name of the game. It sounds like their aggressiveness isn't tied to a cloudy day, queenlessness, etc. It sounds like they're just an aggressive hive. I, personally, wouldn't get them tested, I would requeen and call it good and probably move them out to the sticks until they were successfully requeened.
 

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"They have tried to requeen the hive but those attempts have failed."

Consider calling your State bee inspector. You can call the Dept of Ag in Montgomery to find out the one in north Ala. The State pays attention when possible AHB is involved.
 

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I always figure if your actions will be the same either way, what does it matter to you? Are you not going to requeen if they are not AHB? Are you not going to requeen if they ARE AHB? Seems to me you're going to requeen either way...
 

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There should not be African genetics in Alabama - it is far too wet. That being said, if they are hot who cares - requeen.
 

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Gonna agree with Paul on this one. Most likely, that colony has some Amm genetics that still float around down here. I have a similar colony in my yard. They follow me for 100 yards after working them. And you sure don't want to breathe or blow on them! Just waitin' on the replacement queeno finish cookin'. Then, off with her head!
 

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>The State pays attention when possible AHB is involved.

That seems like a very good reason NOT to test... I fail to understand the idea of mapping the spread of AHB and assuming that AHB are only moving on their own when there are queen breeders in AHB areas shipping queens all over the US... anywhere could have AHB, but whether they are or are not AHB mean bees should be requeened for public safety reasons...
 

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>The State pays attention when possible AHB is involved.

That seems like a very good reason NOT to test... I fail to understand the idea of mapping the spread of AHB and assuming that AHB are only moving on their own when there are queen breeders in AHB areas shipping queens all over the US... anywhere could have AHB, but whether they are or are not AHB mean bees should be requeened for public safety reasons...

yip and I think one of those queens make it to IL. My "neighbor" ( closest beekeeper about 2.5 mi away) got a queen from TX last yr that was determined to be AHB the ive went crazy and state inspector came out and got a sample and then killed it. He then inspected every hive in a X mile radius??? to determine if they had spread locally. So far it seems to have been contained and was killed prior to any swarming, although I'm sure she produced drones so who really knows how much that will effect the temper of local bees??
 

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There should not be African genetics in Alabama - it is far too wet. That being said, if they are hot who cares - requeen.
Hmmmm...Yet there are AHB genetics in Florida?

There is no stopping the spread of the AHB genetics as long as beeks are able to bring their bees to AHB territory and open mate splits...

To the OP...if the bees are too hot to work, they are too hot to work. They WILL requeen themselves eventually...and as long as there are some nice drones to be found, the hive will settle down. Requeening a nasty hive is the worst. ALL QC's have to be destroyed. If there are AHB genetics, they'll just laugh at a Euro queen, and supersede her anyways. Remember...the temperament is most dictated by the drones. They should settle down once a re-queen happens on their own. What did they do to re-queen that failed?
 

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Call your Apiary Inspector. Then requeen if possible. If that doesn't work, kill the colony.
 

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Hmmmm...Yet there are AHB genetics in Florida?
Requeening a nasty hive is the worst. ALL QC's have to be destroyed. If there are AHB genetics, they'll just laugh at a Euro queen, and supersede her anyways. Remember...the temperament is most dictated by the drones. They should settle down once a re-queen happens on their own. What did they do to re-queen that failed?
So have you dealt with AHB in your area and if so, you have seen them " eventually requeen and settle down"?
You have tried and failed at Requeening an AHB hive?
Why would there be QC's to destroy if you are reintroducing a queen immediately after killing a queen?
Inquiring minds want to know.
 

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There should not be African genetics in Alabama - it is far too wet. That being said, if they are hot who cares - requeen.
Mobile, AL...early 90's (I believe it was) AHB confirmed. Thoughts were that it came in on a freighter into Mobile Bay.

Albany and Bainbridge, GA...within the last several years. Not in Alabama, but basically the same climate and a rocks throw across the stateline. An AHB colony found in both towns...one person was killed by the bees while they were pushing up an old demolished house.

Within the last 2 or 3 years AHB genes were found in a colony in Tennessee, I believe it was. These came from a package from Georgia.

Nothing is absolute. Thankfully, though, Alabama (and Mississippi) does have a slight climate difference from it's neighboring states that supposedly will help in regards to AHB intrusion. Last I heard the string of swarm traps that ring the southern and southeastern boundaries of the state have not caught any colonies with AHB genes...but it has been close to a year since I talked with anyone about them.

Brad, being up in your area I would almost think they are going to simply (hopefully?) be some very hot Europeans...unless they are the result of an imported package or something. I don't think that there is a natural "corridor" for africans to travel to get to you...yet.

Email Dennis Barclift with the state, he may very well want to take a sample of them.

Ed
 

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I dont have a ton of experience like some here but as an idea to requeen why wouldnt the following work?

Remove the queen, no matter how painful and remove all frames with eggs. Shake frames so no bees are on frames and place into another hive. Remove same number of egg frames from non hot hive and stick in hot hive. Hot hive will select egg from newly placed non hot hive for queen. Cant see how this would fail. ??
 

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So have you dealt with AHB in your area and if so, you have seen them " eventually requeen and settle down"?
You have tried and failed at Requeening an AHB hive?
Why would there be QC's to destroy if you are reintroducing a queen immediately after killing a queen?
Inquiring minds want to know.
Jim.....Yes to dealing with AHB in this area....And I have absoLUTEly seen the temperament of a colony change after their own re-queen. No question about it! And yes, I spent good money on a few queens, never to be seen again. Seems they just let her lay enough to supercede her. I have been very fortunate with the colonies in my apiary. For the most part, they're all pretty nice. Except when they're not... :lookout: I have never introduced a new queen "immediately"....I see that as a death sentence.
 

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For those wondering about my comment on rainfall and Brazilian/AHB - their brood and swarming cycle is based on rainfall. They tend not to populate areas with a lot of wet and humidity. They literally swarm themselves to death from what I understand, being triggered by the rain. This is why they are rarely found East of Texas, except for isolated mostly tropical areas, like Florida. It seems to be the limiting factor in their spread, much more so than cold, etc. They need distinct rainy seasons followed by nectar flows - intermittent or frequent rainy seasons messes up their cycle.
 

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Paul...I am not posting to be annoying...truly curious to your sources. Swarm season never seems to end down here, rain or not. Swarms slow once rainy season hits, and picks up again when rainy season is over, but we still have swarms. Are you saying AHB swarm MORE in rainy season? (I believe Florida is the only state that has true documented swarms all year round) I'd love to know more about the basis of your statements...for my own learning. I know New Mexico is right up there in the whole AHB reality. Thanks. I also continuously wonder how people think AHB spread is being limited while people still truck bees all over the country. We have a huge influx of Northern beeks around November...to capitalize on our flow and make their splits...which they open mate. So...truck those hives back to NC/SC/IL/OK/MI or wherever, there's no way to know the imported genetics brought into that region.
 

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My opinion is mostly from observation of our genetically weak locals and in part from knowledge passed on by those who work with the full strength variety from Mexico. Part of the reason they have never been able to truly establish themselves in NM is that when the rainy season starts, the blooms do not always follow. Above 6000' or so we don't have them either, as it is too wet and the bloom cycle is not right. But yes, as you stated before African genetics has been trucked around our country for decades, and is still being trucked around. Add to that, there have been nearly 15 documented prior releases of African genetics into our nation before the Brazilians - so yes, you never really know what you are going to get.

Like any other animal, there are certain climate zones they establish themselves in, and seem to gravitate or avoid, at least until they hybridize and become indistinguishable from regular old dark mutt ferals. In the case of Scutellata, they are a creature of the South African savannah and grasslands and the associated rainy seasons, which they depend on for food sources. The likely-hood of running across them in a humid coastal woodland is not as great as running across them in South Texas, with it's associated rainy seasons and dry periods. I would venture to guess AMM would be the likely candidate, but most people cannot tell the difference (if there is one any more). Florida is an anomaly, but from what I understand it does have a monsoonal rain pattern to some degree with interspersed dry periods in many places, so it would make sense to see bees like that there. Again, just my opinion on it.
 
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