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Northeast Ohio. Temps unseasonably warm in the 60s-70s for the last few weeks. Temps going to 50s and high 30s at night by next week. I applied Apivar a little over a month ago to all my hives but 1 by accident. I just realized this today when inspecting their winter stores. Without cell service I couldn't research the best course of action. I took the better late than never approach and put the appropriate # of strips in the hive and closed it up. I know the chemical is a slow release that works over the course of 45 or so days. That will put me into the end of November/Early December. Temps will likely be too cold to pop the hive open and remove the strips. Should I leave them in? Should I remove them and hit them with 4 rounds of OAV over the next month? What would you do?

Quick side question: I had some honey frames in some swarm traps that I just took down. In the frames some of the honey cells had been opened. Inside there was a white grainy substance that I could knock loose out of the cells when I tapped it. The frames had been taken from overwintered hives that I had a candy board on. Is this substance the remnants of the candy board sugar, crystalized honey, or something else entirely? I put the frame (which still had some stored honey) in one of my hives that could use some more winter stores. Hopefully whatever this substance is it wont hurt the bees!
 

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Apivar is not temperature dependent to work. So yes, better late, than never. Just be aware though with a late treatment, that if the mites have damaged the hive enough, they may be beyond saving, even if all mites were killed immediately.

As to your 45 day treatment period, most beekeepers are finding that for apivar a longer period of up to 10 weeks works better.

Re the crystals in your bait frames, sounds like the honey or syrup that was in the frames crystalised, then bees, ants, or whatever came and drank the remaining liquid, and left the crystals. It will not hurt your bees.
 

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6a 3rd yr 5 production hives 1/ 2 q resource hive
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Would have done the same and yes I would leave them in (though manufacturer recommends removal to avoid mites becoming resistant). I've seen it done successfully. Interesting what OldTimer says about 10 weeks. I like that. Also learned something about the crystal response.
 

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I think the 42-56 day period for Apivar is to cover two to three brood cycles when brooding is going on. Apivar can not kill mites under capped brood, so needs to be installed for multiple weeks to kill emerging mites.

My thought is that something like two/three weeks of Apivar is adequate in late fall, in locals where brooding is mostly stopped.

Interested in others thoughts.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Although I have never left Apivar in for the 10 weeks as OT suggested, I did go the full 56 day, 8 week treatment when I was using it. Can't see as how leaving them in for an extended period of time once the bees stop foraging and bringing in new mites could hurt, but it is not following the label and therefore not legal here in the States. Resistance to Amitraz should not be much of an issue if you also wack the mites with an OAV treatment mid-winter.
 
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