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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As most of us have discovered honey eventually crystallizes. Some just naturally stiffen up with a nice fine texture and others very coarse and gritty. My honey is fairly acceptable in this regard and I have seeded it with some Billy Bee creamed honey and it then is excellent. Just dont like the idea of buying it off the store shelf. Is the Billy Bee essentially different or is it only the way it was stirred (or ground) while it was developing. Could I seed further batches of my creamed honey with previous creamed batches?

Just wondering if my honey was slowly and continuously stirred while kept at the magic 57 F. temperature, would it set up with the finer texture?
 

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Like you, for my first batches of creamed honey, I used a commercial product as seed. After that first year, I just set aside a few 5 lbs. batches of my own for the next year's seed. The key to getting a smooth product is to first heat the honey to dissolve all the natural coarse crystals. 15 minutes at 150 degrees will do it. Then let it cool to something below 100 degrees, add your fine seed and stir well. If you stir well, no need to stir when you are pouring. You can pour at 90 degrees but let it set up at the 'magic' 57 degrees, or so.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
57F. is supposed to be the most conducive temp. Dont know what a difference above or below would cause. I am thinking I would pick up an old working freezer and cobble up temperature control that would hold it to the 57F. range. Quite simple with one of the control units like Joerg and Johno use on their band heater vaporizers.

If I works I would like to creme a good portion of my honey at extraction time instead of having to mess around with decrystallizing later as a second operation. Bottling and handling honey is not the thrill it used to be in the first years!
 

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I read that the reason for the name, spun honey, is because the honey is stirred slowly as it cools to keep the crystals from touching and thereby sticking to each other forming larger crystals.
I started with a very nice seed honey and have saved some of mine each year for seed, but with each subsequent batch, it becomes a little more coarse.
I have been wondering if an ice cream maker could be geared down to turn very slowly.

Alex
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I read that the reason for the name, spun honey, is because the honey is stirred slowly as it cools to keep the crystals from touching and thereby sticking to each other forming larger crystals.
I started with a very nice seed honey and have saved some of mine each year for seed, but with each subsequent batch, it becomes a little more coarse.
I have been wondering if an ice cream maker could be geared down to turn very slowly.

Alex
Good question Alex. I had thought about even re-circulating the batch of honey through a slowed down brass gear pump. Kind of a grinding, smearing action.
 
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