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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm going to be doing a few trapouts in the next few weeks. One in a tree, one from a hole in a wall of Palo Duro Canyon, and one from under a guy's shed. Do I have to add a frame of brood to keep the bees there or just if I want them to make their own queen?

Second question - Since bees can find there way in and out of a very small entrance like a robber screen or a closed down entrance on a bottom board, why can't they find there way back into the hive through the screen cone used in the trapout?
 

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Let me answer your questions by asking a single question:

Why does a trap out work?


Your answer should be something along the lines of: A trap out works because the bees can get out of their old hive, but can't get back in. Because they can't go back home, they beg their way into another hive, which they then call their new home. That new home has to be composed of brood and a laying queen (along with their pheromones), and ideally some stores, or it's simply not a home. Gradually, this new home will be more populated than the old home, and the old home will die out from attrition.


What it appears that you're suggesting is placing old comb in a box, out front of their existing hive that has a tube of screen that they'd have to walk through to get in and out.

What incentive is there for them to leave their old hive? And why would they want to stay in your new hive?

(I apologize. I sound cynical when I re-read this before posting. Not my intent. I just want you to understand what happens during a trap out and why.)

Best of luck,
DS
 

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A frame of brood will help the process of creating a viable colony, trapped-out bees are not really a viable colony. A viable colony must have a laying queen, brood and bees. There are many ways to accomplish the assembly of these components to create viable colonies while doing trap-outs.

The screen cone gives the bees a large area (near the base) where they can smell their hive, it works similarly to a robber screen, the robbers can smell where the hive is, so that is where they try to access it. The tiny opening at the tip of the screen cone has very little hives scent to guide the bees back into their hive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
BigDaddy,
I'm a relatively new beek and have never done a trap out. When I read how it is done with the 1/8" hardware cloth it sounds like you just close off their entrance, put on the screen cone so they can get out but can't find their way back in so they take up residence in the hive you provide and if you add a frame of brood and eggs they will make a new queen. Very simple, right? maybe so, I'll soon find out I suppose. I'm just tired of telling folks that the bees got into the wrong place, even though they did. I don't know of any other beeks in the area who might be interested in doing cutouts or trapouts so I get a lot of calls and I can't do them all but if I don't try, they get sprayed. Sooo, since I don't want to completely waste my time and there is no one around here to mentor me, I ask questions on this forum. I didn't take your comments as negative and appreciate the reply.
 
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