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.............

I have wondered about the eating habits of hunter/gatherers. Seems like it wouldn't be much fun, but means you eat things by season, or capture. Kill a deer and that's what you eat for a week..berries are ripe, ditto. Bugs on the other hand have longer available seasons....................Bad weather and scarcity + competition makes one wonder if there were wars over berry patches. Maybe this is why our ancient ancestors might be considered old people at 40ish.

I think only in an overfed, obese, modern society do you see vegetarians and vegans. (enough to be a thing) If we are ever forced to go back to growing all of our own food, this will disappear.
No doubt early people fought over the hunting/fishing/gathering grounds - a very big deal.

Where I grew up, we had pork/beef season - November to April (after that it is hard to keep meats frozen in big volume).
Goose season - October to April.
Chicken season - August/September until no more young roosters to slaughter (occasional chicken through the year).
Fresh egg season - March/April to November.
Fresh milk season - March/April to October.
Roughly April to August was very little fresh meat (salted/dry/canned meats; fresh caught or store bought canned/salted fish).

So it was mostly vegetarian diet April to August/September.

Though meats, bread, and potatoes were considered the "real food".
Looking back, it is shame so many good vegetable options were ignored or considered animal feed.
Just a shame for that.
 

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The largest native American Indian battle in Michigan ever recorded was fought not far from where I live. The Eastern Michigan tribes, one around Detroit and the other near Port Huron had severe drought and their corn crops failed.
These 2 tribes formed a plan to canoe in on the Grand and the Maple rivers and attack and wipe out the Indians at the confluence of the 2 rivers at the now towns of Lyons and Muir, and steal their grain.

Unfortunately, or fortunately depending on which side you were on, The Grand river system experienced a lot of rain and the river was flowing a lot faster. A hunter from the Lyons/Muir tribes spied the approaching war party on the Grand and sounded the alarm. They were able to ambush the approaching war party and wipe them out. They also gained the intelligence that there was a second war party approaching on the Maple and set another ambush, killing most of them a day or 2 later.

The large flood plain flats around Lyons and Muir are full of Indian artifacts. Michigan archaeologists have spent a lot of time there. I spent a few hours there with permission from the farmer and found several arrow heads, cutting tools and one corn mill rock. A few miles up stream on the Grand I found a flint knife about 5 inches long. It shows re-sharpening and is one of the best points found in the area according to an amateur archeologist friend. Dumb luck on my part to find it, I was looking for worms for fishing. My friend was disgusted as he has spent a very large amount of time in study and poking around and has never found a point like that one. I eventually gave it to him in trade for a lawn mower.

I know where there are undisturbed burial mounds, I will not tell anyone where they are. There are a lot of artifacts in that area as well, but I don't believe in grave digging, and have had some native American friends. (wouldn't take kindly to someone digging up my grandparents graves)
 

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The largest native American Indian battle in Michigan ever recorded was fought not far from where I live. The Eastern Michigan tribes, one around Detroit and the other near Port Huron had severe drought and their corn crops failed.
These 2 tribes formed a plan to canoe in on the Grand and the Maple rivers and attack and wipe out the Indians at the confluence of the 2 rivers at the now towns of Lyons and Muir, and steal their grain.

Unfortunately, or fortunately depending on which side you were on, The Grand river system experienced a lot of rain and the river was flowing a lot faster. A hunter from the Lyons/Muir tribes spied the approaching war party on the Grand and sounded the alarm. They were able to ambush the approaching war party and wipe them out. They also gained the intelligence that there was a second war party approaching on the Maple and set another ambush, killing most of them a day or 2 later.

The large flood plain flats around Lyons and Muir are full of Indian artifacts. Michigan archaeologists have spent a lot of time there. I spent a few hours there with permission from the farmer and found several arrow heads, cutting tools and one corn mill rock. A few miles up stream on the Grand I found a flint knife about 5 inches long. It shows re-sharpening and is one of the best points found in the area according to an amateur archeologist friend. Dumb luck on my part to find it, I was looking for worms for fishing. My friend was disgusted as he has spent a very large amount of time in study and poking around and has never found a point like that one. I eventually gave it to him in trade for a lawn mower.

I know where there are undisturbed burial mounds, I will not tell anyone where they are. There are a lot of artifacts in that area as well, but I don't believe in grave digging, and have had some native American friends. (wouldn't take kindly to someone digging up my grandparents graves)
Your archaeologist friend should take up fishing.
 

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There are lots of ways people virtue signal while causing damage to the causes they claim to support.
Honeybees benefit from good beekeepers.
Birds keeping is another field that is suffering from lot of sanctimonious absurdity.
A few years ago they made it illegal to transport any birds species that is on endangered lists between state lines.
This affected many species that are commonly bred and kept and more importantly rarer species that are not commonly
bred and will be even rarer thanks to this law.
The breeder market needs the pet bird market to be able to keep their conservation efforts going and stop some species of birds from going totally extinct!
We do not have any wild imports of birds anymore as far as I know and good breeders don't want wild caught birds for the most part so there is no way
their efforts decrease the numbers in the wild but in fact they increase the numbers of species worldwide.
Beekeeping and many other human interests have become targets for radical politics to the detriment of everyone.....
 

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He goes fishing far more than I do. I think it is an issue of eyesight. A few years back he had corrective eye surgery and was really surprised to be able to see clearly.
He is one of the most accomplished flint knappers around.
Here is his website; https://www.artofishi.com/

Not a commercial plug, just to show off his beautiful work. His collection of archeological finds is extensive. He does work with the professional end of the science.
 

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He goes fishing far more than I do. I think it is an issue of eyesight. A few years back he had corrective eye surgery and was really surprised to be able to see clearly.
He is one of the most accomplished flint knappers around.
Here is his website; https://www.artofishi.com/

Not a commercial plug, just to show off his beautiful work. His collection of archeological finds is extensive. He does work with the professional end of the science.
Wow, nice work. Thanks for sharing.
 
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