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We have good relations with our neighbors to the East, but they are very different people, don't like "natural" things, and will disapprove of the bees.

We'd previously decided not to tell them. All of the other neighbors, except for them know.

We've deliberately located our hive out of their immediate sight, but they will eventually find out... They will probably be doubly unimpressed that everyone but them knew.

I've reconsidering my strategy of silence, and am wondering if I should involve them, and my other neighbors, for the hiving. From my reading, the (sugar sprayed) bees are very tame at this time, and showing that they can be worked with suitless should alleviate anyone's concerns.

Transparency, or secrecy?

Thoughts?
 

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Sounds like you need a conversation starter. Buy them a jar of natural honey and see how sour they are really. Ask them what they know about bees and pollinating a third of our food. If you really feel it is hopeless they will be the only neighbors that can not enjoy the hive with you. It may come down to an assume thing and you do not want to make one of them or U.
 

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If you really think they will be a problem, silence might be the best bet. If they find out a year later, at least they'll already know the bees aren't a problem.
 

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My first hive was one I was given last Oct. I put it in a semi-hidden part of my yard. Sadly, they died during the winter.

Just today my two new nucs of bees arrived and I have only told one of my 3 immediate neighbors about them. i mentioned it to the elderly couple last month, and they were nice enough, but looked a bit worried. I was able to truthfully tell them, "Oh, I had a hive last year too, and you see?- they didn't bother you at all, I bet you didn't even know they were there!" ;)
...I didn't mention that they were only active for about a month last year before winter set in, and then they died. :cool:

Like KQ6 said..... if you can keep the bees for a couple of months first and then when the subject comes up, by that time the neighbors may see for themselves that the bees have not been causing a problem.

Lots of people assume any bees will be swarming after them like in killer bee movies.
 

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Granted, our nearest neighbor isn't that close (we're in a rural area), but we checked with neighbors up to a couple of miles down the road to make sure neither they, nor their children or grandchildren, were allergic.

The day of the hiving was quite interesting. The neighbors that stopped during the hiving probably thought I was a little weird anyway. After seeing me in short sleeves with bees crawling on my arm, they were convinced. :) They did like me showing them the queen in the cage.

So, with that, I'd say put on your excited look and say "Wow! Look what we're going to do . It's so cool. You want to help?"

Might work...might not.

Walt
 

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My vote it to tell your neighbors. I would do like Americanbeekeeper said..buy some local honey have the wife make a fresh pot of coffee and some big old cat head biscuits and slice up a fresh honeydew melon and invite them over for breakfast. What ever you decide good luck to you:)
 

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This discussion makes me even happier I have the neighbors I do. When I told them we were thinking about bees, their response was "will they make it down to our garden?"
 

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When I took the class at the U of M it was strongly advised by Marla and Gary to inform the neighbors because, as they said, no one should keep bees if the nearest neighbors are allergic. At first I felt like it wasn't their business whether I had bees or not since I was my property but then I thought about the table being turned. I wouldn't want someone dying because of me.

We had one neighbor we were certain would make a stink and they are the neighbors now that are the most interested in the process and even came out to watch me hive our first package. The neighbors I thought would be the most interested were the least but yet supportive of my new hobby. It turned out that the particular neighbor not so excited his mother nearly died from an allergic reaction to a sting so his fear is warranted. He's ok with the hobby now just a little hesitant to talk to me about it.

If your neighbors don't like the idea just out of fear, I wouldn't worry about it but they might have legitimate concerns if someone is allergic and it can make for ugly neighbor relations in the future if they later learn that you informed some neighbors and not them especially if one of them gets stung and they have a nasty reaction to it. All they need is the excuse that you didn't mention your new hobby and they are now ill from it.

Personally, I plan on being in my neighborhood for a few years and wanted it to be as peaceful as possible.
 

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I went to my neighbors and before I told them I was getting bee's I asked if anyone in the house is allergic to bee's. Once they told me no, then I told them I was getting bee's. I stated that they should not be any kind of trouble for them, and if for some reason there is a problem let me know immediately and we would take care of it. No one complained and at the end of the year I again went to each house and asked if they had any problems with my bee's and all said the same thing. "I did not notice any increase the number of bee's at all".

Just make to ask before you tell. I you tell and they don't like bee's you can be sure someone will be allergic in that house!

Steve
 

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I also went to the immediate neighbors and asked about allergies and gave them a chance to voice any objections. One neighbor has a day-care, and I was worried a bit about them, but they seemed less concerned than anybody. The local husbands (not the wives so much, for some reason) all seem interested in coming over to check them out, and the wives are all looking forward to some free honey! I recommend talking first, but I wouldn't necessarily "ask permission".
 

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"What do you mean you didn't know I had bees... I told everyone! Maybe you weren't home the day I went around and told everyone"! I'm sorry, I wasn't trying to keep it a secret...

:doh:
 

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I never tell them. Because:

1) It's none of their business.
2) They can't comprehend what it means to have bees living in a hive in my yard anyway.

If they find out a year after the bees have been there (typical) then all of those fears and fuming they would have been going through just never happened. They have to realize that the bees already were not a problem.
 

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My neighbor on one side is my sister, and she don't care if I have bees. On the other side, well I didn't ask or tell, because they didn't ask me when they put their barking dogs right up against my fence, or when they played loud music half the night, or had parties... you get the idea.
 

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I have relatives allergic to bees, and they know the risks, and the steps to take should they get stung by a bee. That being said, I seriously doubt that hives in my backyard (and yes my backyard is fairly small and close to all my neighbors) will contribute a significant and raised chance of any of my neighbors getting stung. I was out in my yard weeks before installing my hives and counted several hundred bees in and out of my yard anyway. During my install I had neihbors 15 feet away on the other side of a vinyl fence, they were doing yard work, mowing, trimming tree branches etc. the whole time I was there. They never stopped their activities nor did I hear them comment, Obviously they never even noticed even with the increased number of bees in the air. I've been working out in the yard the last couple weeks since the install literally feet away from the hives. If I get about 4-5 feet away a few will come up and bump me away. but other than that they take no notice of me other than an occasional curious "howdy" or fly by. I'm of the opinion of several others here. What the neighbors don't know won't hurt them.
 

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all well said, and well ment. I had a small bee yard on a friend's property. The lot directly behind them was bought and built on while my bees were there. when the new owners moved in, nothing was said for about 2 months. Then I am told by the friend that the owners asked him if they were his bees, he said "no" and gave them my name. They told him that my bees were stinging their kids, and if I didn't move them, they would just go and spray them.

these people are city folk, and don't understand the difference between bees. And they certanly don't want to learn. I moved them, and considered placing empty hives where they were, but decided that would just be stirring the pot. but honestly, all I did was move them about 400 yards out to the other end of the field. if they do try anything, I have camera's on the hives, and they have to cross at least 2 people's property who know I have them, and are fine with it, but not the new neighbors.
 

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Where I'm from, what you do in your yard is nobody's business but yours.
That's good and fine, Ross, however bees don't stay confined in your yard. That's the unique thing about them.

I may have the law and every right on my side to keep bees in my yard, but I still told all our neighbors I was going to keep bees and to let me know if they were bothered by them. And while I had that conversation I also showed them an example of a dead wasp and told them that these were not honey bees, and that those pesky wasps that try to get to your food and drinks were these guys. To this day none of my neighbors has complained, in fact they are pretty proud to have "our" bees around. Plus a bottle of honey on occasion from "our" bees doesn't hurt either. I find being open about it works best in the long run, and informing your neighbors of your hobby is the right thing to do. It shows you being considerate and neighborly. It has worked well for me...
 

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i didnt ask anyones "permission" but what i did was i set them in PLAIN view from the Hwy -

and i tell ya what - all of my nieghbors came wanting honey -

and PEOPLE how see hives think you have HONEY -- i get about 2-5 people a day stop to get honey .........and ive NEVER put out a Honey for Sale sign!!!!!


LET the hives sell the product for you !!!!!!!

also what happens on my 17 acers....... STAYS on my 17 acers !!!!!!!


if a nieghbor wants to tell me what i can or cant do .........he can pay my Taxes !!!!!!

nough said ---- get some bees and have a blast .... also id tell them that if they will not let you keep honeybees - that you will start keeping HORNETS instead -- no law says you cant have 50 of them nests hangin around !!!!
 

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Just make to ask before you tell. I you tell and they don't like bee's you can be sure someone will be allergic in that house!

Steve
The good thing is, if someone claims to be allergic to bees you could ask if they carry an epipen. Most people have no clue what an epipen is unless they have a serious bee allergy in which case they would have been given one by a doctor. A lot of people say they are allergic because they swell up after being stung, but a true life threatening allergy would have required hospitalization and a prescription of an epipen for future stings. (I had that inquiry prepared for if/when my neighbors claimed to be allergic).
 
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