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Mutts.
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Newbie again after 47 years! My dad built a hive about 1970. Apparently not a standard size since I remember him cutting about 2" off the ends of the foundation wax. Post Office called when the package of bees arrived, they wanted us to come get them! Did not want to keep them overnight. Seem to recall they were a variety called Midnight.

Moved in 1972 and took the hive with us. Borrowed a veil and smoker from a relative and very disappointed their was no surplus to 'rob'. Bees died or disappeared shortly after we moved. Later gave the empty hive to the same cousin who had loaned us the veil.

Have thought of bees off and on through the years. Even lurked here (and other forums) at times. Never signed up until a few days ago. Nice to see the pictures and perhaps ask a question or two. Recently discovered a coworker is also interested in bees so we may both join the local club and attend meetings. He is not a forum junkie like I am, but have invited him here.

No illusions of making money, but do want to keep costs down and possibly offset some losses. That said - will probably start with an observation hive:-O Have seen several through the years at fairs and festivals and they are so fascinating to watch! . Also interested in alternative hive materials, but that is a much longer term goal. Oh, currently have an occupied observation bat house so no stranger to to the odd and unusual.

Realize this is long for a introduction so will end this here.
 

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welcome aboard wb!

lots of nice wooded lands around jasper, most likely some wild type feral honeybees surviving in those woods.

one way to offset costs and possibly end up with some hearty bees is to set out swarm traps in the spring.
 

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Mutts.
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks, already have plans for a couple of hanging traps by spring. However any long term feral bees are probably too far away to catch. Just the past two or three years are we again seeing honey bees. Prior to that were several years with almost none. Bumble bees flourished and filled the void. Pretty sure the pumpkin farm next door has them again. Also someone on the next road over has at least eight hives. Four each on trailers, one of which stays in his front yard year round and the other comes and goes.

16 acres (our 5 plus in-laws 11) so plenty of room for traps and hives. Just more likely to catch a neighbors swarm or a recently feral one than a Holygrail.

Hope I do not have to work late Thursday. Linda Tillman from Atlanta is the guest speaker this month and the topic is treatment free beekeeping.
 

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Hi William,

Welcome to Beesource. I hope that you enjoy your journey.
 

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Mutts.
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271 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks tpope! Looks like my first bees will be from you. Hope 60 miles is still 'local' enough to give me a huge head start on becoming treatment free. Know from my reading here how difficult it is. Also have found TF is even more controversial in real life than here on the forum.

Update: Have done a lousy job of keeping costs down:( Observation hive is on hold for now... Have one complete hive ready to go and two lids away from having three short hives. Got a nice ant proof hive stand in progress as well as a swarm trap (6 gallon tube) and four ten frame deep traps that need temp tops / bottoms and hung up by spring. One of which will be placed at a coworkers place several miles away at the base of a mountain. Might stand a slightly better chance of catching ferrals there than at home.

Plan to build a few Advantec nucs then switch gears to some boring non bee related stuff.
 

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Thanks for the good words squarepeg..

I like to use advantec for tops and bottoms. I have found that it is a bit heavy for bodies but that is just me.

I do not feel that our environments are very different. My bees should behave the same for you. That said, other local bee havers may be a greater influence to your efforts.
 

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William:

Welcome to Beesource- I enjoyed reading your introduction and it sounds like you are making steady progress.

I for one will look forward to hearing how your apiary shapes-up- with bees from TPope, I expect you will be off to a great start.

I've attached a neat article from the 1796 American Bee Journal discussing the Midnite and Starline bee breeding effort courtesy of Mr. Randy Oliver at: http://scientificbeekeeping.com/

Again, welcome and here's hoping that your beekeeping year exceeds your expectations.

Witherell,Peter article from Feb 1976 ABJ - pg 1of3-1.jpg Witherell,Peter article from Feb 1976 ABJ - pg 2of3-1.jpg Witherell,Peter article from Feb 1976 ABJ - pg 3of3-1.jpg
 

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Mutts.
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Litsinger:

Thanks! Your attachments are still pending approval for some reason, but I will check back. Do not remember where, but did read recently that Midnite and Starline bees were F1 hybrids.
 

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Moderator - In Memorium
Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Attachments in the welcome forum are often held pending approval. Russ' should have gone through. I could not read the text on my phone with my eyesight. Maybe a full-sized computer screen will provide better resolution.
 
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