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PS: Litsinger - hint, hint.
Now I like the way you think, GregV. Maybe I will let Happy Home get tired of filling his yard up with 'survivor-stock' genetics and then I'll politely ask if I can set-up a trap-line in the Ozarks!
 

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Little surprised at the $450, but it may be the true cost.
............All the same, you probably were not budgeting on something like that when you started the hobby.
In the case of HH, it maybe someone be actually be interested to visit him .
I certainly would IF not for the distance.

Pretty much, I am ready to share some of my experience/resources/time in exchange for access to promising genetic material when I can
That where the real value is.

"If the mountain will not come to Muhammad, then Muhammad must go to the mountain".
 

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Now I like the way you think, GregV. Maybe I will let Happy Home get tired of filling his yard up with 'survivor-stock' genetics and then I'll politely ask if I can set-up a trap-line in the Ozarks!
On a paper map, you guys look just a short drive away apart!
 

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........ So for the cost of two nucs and a couple of hive bodies, you get to spend a day with a renowned expert. Got to keep it all in perspective.
If I was Dr. Sharashkin, I'd just run a line of give away little nucs and give them as complement to the visitors.
If you think of it - setting up a line of little nucs over summer costs near nothing to you.
And yet I somehow feel - there will be a line of visitors waiting to spend a day visiting and take a nuc home too.

The visiting price can be raised too to offset the nuc price.
Any nucs left not taken - just keep as-is or combine.
Everyone happy.
 

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Little surprised at the $450, but it may be the true cost.
If there is going to be a little one on one education with the opportunity to work along side him, I would say it is worth it.
Oldtimer:

Great stories (as always). I enjoy reading about your experiences, and you and JW bring up good points.

I should clarify that I wasn't making a judgment call about Dr. Sharashkin being worth a professional consultation but that I was simply disappointed that there wasn't something more personal available to someone in their hometown, especially if it was a simple, 'may I come by and see your set-up and introduce myself' kind of thing. That said, I don't expect free advice from my lawyer, financial consultant or doctor so I suppose being a professional beekeeper is no different.

I recognize (but may not appreciate) that beekeeping as your livelihood is different than beekeeping as your hobby.

Thanks again to you both for the perspective.

Russ
 

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April 30, 2019 I caught my first swarm, so I am very new to keeping bees, I caught my second swarm on May 12, from the same tree that is very close to my home.
Welcome to beekeeping. There are many ways to keep bees for fun. May you find your way cheerfully and with humility and gratitude.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
I wish to go on record as being non judgmental on Dr. Sharashkin being too expensive with his expertise. I did not feel offended it was just that I could not afford to spend that kind of money to visit his apiary. I really was not interested in having him open any of his hives for an inspection. I could have had a lot of value just seeing the activity of the bees around his hives. I actually had an interest in build a hive from his plans, but I thought I would like to see one first. I have almost decided to not go with a layens hive now, mostly because of my inability to afford to take a look at what I should expect to see.

I am sure that Dr. Sharashkin is a wonderful person and a very good beekeeper. Someday it is possible that I can meet him and become friends, at least that is my hope. maybe someday I will win the lottery and be able to afford to expend that kind of money.

Happy Home
 

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I actually had an interest in build a hive from his plans, but I thought I would like to see one first. I have almost decided to not go with a layens hive now, mostly because of my inability to afford to take a look at what I should expect to see.
Good choice not to build one.

Langstroth hives have been tested in the field for 150 years and survived virtually unchanged from what the Reverent Langstroth originally built. They have performed well, stood the test of time, probably 99% of hives in the USA are Langstroth, they are preferred by commercial beekeepers, and there is a reason for all that.

Beekeepers by definition, tend to be an individualistic and inventive group, and there are plenty of minds thinking up different hive designs. The designers, and their followers, will always present their particular design in the most favorable light, and reading their literature can be beguiling. My advice, be open minded, but also be a slow adopter of "new improved" hive designs.
 

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I wish to go on record as being non judgmental on Dr. Sharashkin being too expensive with his expertise. .......

Happy Home
HH,
It is actually a good idea to NOT jump up and spend money for advanced course work while you are a beginner - UNTIL you are ready to consume the information served to you.
Eventually you may decide you don't even need it.
OR - if still want to visit - you'll be able to consume much more useful info for your time and money's worth.

You know - Calc 101 --> Calc 201 --> Calc 301....
You don't jump to Calc 301 immediately since you will not be able to consume the info they will dump on you.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
HH,
It is actually a good idea to NOT jump up and spend money for advanced course work while you are a beginner - UNTIL you are ready to consume the information served to you.
I agree, GregV

Oh I actually was pretty close to you late last night, I did not have any extra time to kill with bees but I did think of you. I am not sure where exactly you are located but I was in Harvard Illinois.

There about 2 hours and headed back to the heat in Southern Missouri.

Happy Home
 

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I agree, GregV

Oh I actually was pretty close to you late last night, I did not have any extra time to kill with bees but I did think of you. I am not sure where exactly you are located but I was in Harvard Illinois.

There about 2 hours and headed back to the heat in Southern Missouri.

Happy Home
Just 1-2 hours from me, indeed.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
Hi everyone, I feel blessed today I (mostly finished) bottling 28 pounds of honey from my 2 hives. I did not expect to get any honey at all this year since I caught the swarms this spring.

I have one hive with 2 deep boxes and one super. and one hive with 1 deep box and 3 supers, from which I robbed 5 frames from each of the top supers, leaving the rest for the bees for the winter.

It was a pleasant experience to share a pound of honey with each of the folks that attend our church, and still have a little left over to help advertise a little on the expectation of having a little to sell for next year.

I am not sure exactly what I should expect but that did seem like a pretty good haul from 10 frames of honey. I did crush and strain and now I need to figure out what to do with the bowl of wax that I have left over.

It has been a wonderful experience so far with the bees.

Happy Home
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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You Tube videoes can show you how to process and clean the wax. 10 medium frames should net you right at or just over 1# of cleaned wax. Make tea candles or votives and give to the church members to remind them that bees produce more than just honey. It is fun too!
 

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Discussion Starter #39
Thanks GregV

That does bring up a question. Here in southern Missouri, I am not sure about getting the hives ready for winter. What do I need to do. I think I left enough honey for the bees so I hope to not feed them. The local guy that I have been talking to has not mentioned any type of wrap for the hives, I am going to have to ask some specific questions as to what I need to do.

I just hope to have bees in the spring. two hives hopefully and if so I intend to split at least one of them for increase. Possibly creating several nucs to raise into full colonies.

what a wonderful experience so far.

Happy Homel
 

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Hi Litsinger,

I do not know if Dr. Sharashkin is a member of this forum or not, but I did reach out to him via email, and asked if it would be possible to just visit his apiary.

I was disappointed to get the reply that I would be welcome to visit for the fee of $450.00. He explained that he did have some other people interested in visiting and if I was interested I would be allowed to visit when they did and reduce to cost to $150.00.

I explained that I was not able to spend that kind of money for the visit and thanked him for his reply.

Based on this experience I get the Idea that Dr. Sharashkin is not interested in being any type of mentor.

Happy Home
Happy Home He has a couple books, the 40 bucks and the read would get you 80% of what he is doing. He basically advocates catching the local stock, so you are on the same trail. Unfortunately he is making a living from it so it is all monetized at this point for him. Check out some of the "swarm trap posts" and yes welcome aboard. You will soon either love or hate the bees and the keeping, For some it is addicting. If the 2 hives you have make it , spring splits would be another item to research this winter.
GG
 
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