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here in northeast alabama we are transitioning out of winter and into spring and the high temperature has been fluctuating from the upper thirties to the lower seventies.

i've noticed that on the warmer days when we hit 60 or more the bees are foraging nectar and pollen. on the cooler days when it only gets up to 45 - 55 they are only going to the nearby pond for water.

i'm guessing that on the cooler days they either they can't fly far enough for pollen/nectar or it isn't available or both, and i assume they are using the water to dilute the honey stores for feed.
 

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I am thinking on a cooler days they are too lazy to fly farther away to collect nectar and pollen. It is better to stay close
to home to collect whatever is needed instead like water. What do you think?
 

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I am higher and colder than SP, but I see similar activity. Last week my bees were bringing in maple pollen (and possibly nectar, but I didn't see them hauling water). On the colder days this week they were collecting water, but the bucket (with floats) where they often go for water was iced. However, I have some stacked garbage bags of shredded leaves (waiting for compost bin space) that were leaking water. Obviously the water was above freezing (possibly due to the sun warmed black bags) and the bees were there most of the day.
 

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Bees have a distinctive pattern of temperature dependent foraging. At 35 to 40 degrees with bright sun they will fly out for a poop run but only within 50 feet of the hive. At 45 to 50 degrees, they will do more extended foraging runs for water and with pollen collection if flowers are close enough. At 55 to 60 degrees, they actively forage several hundred yards from the colony. 65 degrees and above they will forage just about anywhere.

There are race related differences. On average, Italians need 5 degree higher temps than Carniolans for the same level of foraging. Apis Mellifera Mellifera will forage at lower temps than Carniolans.

Please note above the "bright sun". It makes the difference between flying and staying indoors.
 

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I am thinking on a cooler days they are too lazy to fly farther away to collect nectar and pollen. It is better to stay close
to home to collect whatever is needed instead like water. What do you think?
Could also be tied to nectar and pollen production of the plants, above 60 degrees they may produce more or a higher percentage of sugars in the nectar. Also individual plants have a wide range of nectar production depending on the micro climate that they are located in. A maple tree in my front yard is loaded with blooms but I never see a bee in the tree which is 20 yards from the hive but the same species of maple in a more natural setting on the side of the ridge is getting hit hard with foraging bees. Foraging bees have a complex strategy that hard to figure out unless you get a bucket truck and start checking sugar content of nectar sources.
 
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