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I saw on instructables where instead of shaking the bees out they placed the entire box inside the hive box. Of course this was done after placing the queen between frames and sugar water can is removed. They instructed to come back after a couple of days to remove the box, etc.

Does anyone use this technique? It seems to be less traumatic for bees.
 

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I saw on instructables where instead of shaking the bees out they placed the entire box inside the hive box. Of course this was done after placing the queen between frames and sugar water can is removed. They instructed to come back after a couple of days to remove the box, etc.

Does anyone use this technique? It seems to be less traumatic for bees.
A couple of different thoughts here: Package Install Question
 

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There are many ways to install a package with none of them really being the all-time right or wrong way.

I prefer to bump and dump but mainly because I only use packages to fill my mating nucs. Others are entirely new and aren't comfortable shaking bees all over the place. Placing the package in the hive with the queen on the frames is probably the least intrusive.

However, shaking them in certainly doesn't hurt them. If you wet them down with some light sugar syrup to where they can't fly it goes incredibly smooth. It also doesn't require you to come back to remove the cage - unless you're removing the cage and checking the queen has been released at the same time.

Whatever you're most comfortable with is the right choice.
 

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For the two packages I installed last year, and the one I did this year, I just place the box inside of the hive and then remove it three days later when I confirm the queen has escaped her cage.

It was a bit of a fiasco this time though, because when I removed the sugar water can, the queen cage broke loose from the strap and fell down into the mass of bees. I removed my glove, took a deep breath, and reached in and retrieved her.

Until they are locked in on a hive (or brood) they are extremely docile from my experience. If you're installing 50 packages, shaking probably makes a lot of sense. If you're just doing a couple, I don't see a need to be so rough. Either way they aren't going to mind, too much.
 

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we have frost predicted here for the week, just be sure there are bees to cover the cadged queen for the night, or it may be you who has trauma , while waiting for the replacement Queen you need to buy.
put the bee box under the frames and queen, the bees want to go to the top of the space to start their hive.

I bump and dump unless it is too cold, then what ever i need to make it work.

GG
 

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Does anyone use this technique? It seems to be less traumatic for bees.
There are lots of wrong ways. In my opinion this is one of them. You often end up with comb in the box or bees building comb from the cover. Just shake them out and get them where they belong with no place for them to build comb outside of the frames.

 
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