Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Queenless hive. It’s an eight frame deep. 6 frames are full of capped honey, nectar, and bee bread. The other 2 frames are mostly drawn out plastic foundation. There are no eggs, larva, or brood what’s so ever. No evidence of laying workers. They are not making Queen cells, or any type of supercedure cells. Basically just an eight framer full of honey and nectar? The bee population seems to be average or a bit above? The bees are very gentile. Inspected the hive yesterday, and did not have to use smoker.

I ordered a new mated Queen which will arrive Tuesday or Wednesday. I could use some advise or ideas about installing the new Queen?? Once the new Queen begins laying there should be 2 drawn out frames which she could use. Most of the other frames are filled with honey and nectar. My question is...will the new Queen have enough room to start laying?? If she is accepted, will the workers start to move the nectar around to give her space to lay??

Thank you in advance!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,176 Posts
I say you may need some more space. Not a whole lot more but you mention that the 6 frames are "full" of stores. They'll use some as she starts laying (as you mentioned, if she is accepted) but I'd probably pull a couple of capped frames out and replace with comb. Check back to see how she's doing once she starts up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,186 Posts
She will not have room to lay and since I do not know where geographically you are located, I cannot guess if you have a honey crop still to gather. It is also impossible for me to know if your colony is actually queenless or has a newly mated or virgin queen about to start laying. That makes a new queens acceptance impossible. Old bees in a queenless colony are also slow to accept a new cage queen. Do you know anyone who might sell you a frame of brood with eggs and larvae? That will really help. Within two days you will know if your colony is indeed queenless as emergency cells will be visible.
If that is not possible, before introducing the new queen, I would shake the bees off the frames several yards out in front of the hive. That way any non laying queen would tend to get lost and allow acceptance of your new queen. Yes it is possible for the bees to have a non laying queen. I once marked one out of curiosity to see how long she might continue to not lay. After better than a month, I shook out the elderly surviving bees and let them find new homes.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top