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Discussion Starter #1
So I installed 3 hives of bees yesterday that we picked up. It was threatening rain all day, and we were advised to get them in if it wasn't raining. As most of you know, the weather has been crazy this week. I didn't want to wait until Friday.

While installing them, it started to drizzle and then rain. Imagine that.

I managed to get the bees and queen cage in each hive, and you know there are all always those bees that refuse to come out of that wooden box. They usually do well when you set them up against the entrance, and find their way in. But when it's raining, death is usually what happens. SO, we set up 3 umbrellas over each wooden box, in hopes they wouldn't get wet and drown. Maybe they would manage to crawl in. We had a terrible storm last night. The umbrellas were fine, and the wooden boxes stayed dry.

The bees that were still in the boxes were in a small ball, I guess staying warm as possible.

I have an idea, and want to run it by everyone.

What if I put a medium super on top, took out the frames, and put the box with the remaining bees inside on top of the deep that I installed the bees in? That way, they could crawl out and be with the others, and hopefully be out of that box, and out of this weather they are calling for all week.

My only fears is disturbing at all the bees that I installed yesterday. I just don't want all those other bees to die, the ones left in the boxes.

Thoughts????
 

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At this point I think I would just shake them out of the package on top of the frames. If you put the package on the hive with another super, be sure to check it the next day. With that open space you will probably get comb built where you don't want it, and the longer that space is there the bigger mess you will have. Also, for some reason the bees that stayed in the package don't seem to be picking up on the queen's pheromones. They have been in the package a while now and may consider it "home" and refuse to leave on their own. I think shaking them out and taking the empty packages a good distance away is the best option.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I agree with both of you. Because of this weather, I went ahead and took an empty super box, no frames, and put the box with the remaining bees in it, on top of the deep. Everyone was nice, and I did it as quickly as possible. I will go back out there tomorrow evening and remove the box. I am hoping they are not all about being back inside that box. I could not let them just be out there and die. I felt so bad for them in that box last night during that awful thunderstorm.

I don't mind cleaning out the comb if they will be out of the box. I did try to shake them out, and that bulge of bees did not move.

Do you think tomorrow morning is sufficient time for them to be OUT of that wooden box?
 

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when i dump packages, i shake them into the hive body, add three or 4 frames i removed back in, add the queen, then place inner cover over them. then put empty box on top inner cover, and place the package box in there with the opening down so the bees can get into the lower box easily. then outter cover to seal them up. after a day or two, i pull the empty package box and thats that.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
when i dump packages, i shake them into the hive body, add three or 4 frames i removed back in, add the queen, then place inner cover over them. then put empty box on top inner cover, and place the package box in there with the opening down so the bees can get into the lower box easily. then outter cover to seal them up. after a day or two, i pull the empty package box and thats that.
That's a good idea about the inner cover. I wish I would have thought about that. It may be too late for me to go back out and add that. I don't want to disturb them much more.
 

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Good advice Homesteader,best way to handle it.That method Homesteader described eliminates the problems that can occur.Get them out get the package out of there done.Best option as Homesteader stated.
 

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when i dump packages, i shake them into the hive body, add three or 4 frames i removed back in, add the queen, then place inner cover over them. then put empty box on top inner cover, and place the package box in there with the opening down so the bees can get into the lower box easily. then outter cover to seal them up. after a day or two, i pull the empty package box and thats that.
I did the same thing with two hives, except I used a medium super and the packages didn't fit upright. And it covered the hole when laid sideways. No problem though. I shimmed it up with a couple of sticks. The next day 99% of the bees were down in the hives.
 

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If you are not shy about slamming the package to knock them free, you can get all but 10 or 15 bees out of the package. Even more if you cut the screen (or pry the wood that holds the screen) off of one side. Gentleness is for handling frames. Violence is for getting bees off of combs or out of boxes... The right thing at the right time is the goal...
 

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I am of the mindset of just get them inside the hive as quick as possible and don't give them any reason to go somewhere you don't want them, such as back in the box. I dumped my packages into their hive by shaking them (all) inside, added the frames back on top of the mass of bees (they move)and some syrup on top of the inner cover. After closing up the hive, I direct released the queen through the hive entrance by uncorking the end and letting her walk out inside the hive. I did not leave the package or queen box anywhere near the hive because I was afraid they would 'smell' it and try to go back inside or have some queenless swarm on the queen box.
 
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