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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well opened the hive up today and looked at every frame. I just added a deep yesterday and I basically check the hive every night almost, I just cant help myself, if there is a reason I shouldnt do this someone set me straight. Anyway they have not done anything to the second deep yet that I can tell. The bottom brood chamber has 6 frames completely full, one half full and three empty, New eggs all over the place and lots of empty brood cells on a couple of the frames. I actually got to see several new brood chewing and squeezing there way out of the cells which was very cool. First time for all of this for me. I looked them all over pretty good wings all look good, didnt see any mites but have never seen one so dont know exactly what Im looking for. Also have not yet found my queen, again really dont know what Im looking for or how she looks different other then being bigger. I think I did narrow down what frame she was on though because the bees were all real calm and moving slowly compared to the other frames Some other fellows have talked me in too removing my queen excluder from under my second deep and letting the queen use the honey stores for brood if she wants so Im going to have to open this again in a little while I guess. Ok now for some more questions.
1. Should I get a sticky pad and screen to check for mites as part of prevention?
2. Does opening and inspecting the hive too much hurt anything, I know too basically leave them alone when its cold this winter, or if its raing bad weather etc, I mean on sunny nice days?
3. When should I expect the bees to start draing out comb in the new deep? Im using plastic wax coated foundation and I sprayed it with syrup before putting it in.
4. After the brood emerge from their cells does the queen use these cells to lay in again and again? I did see a bunch of empty brood cells but did not see any new eggs in them.
This is more a comment then a question, there was quite a bit of burr comb yesterday that I removed, it happened to be full of honey man was it good:D
 

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I know you want too,But hold off on checking in the hive so often. Give your girls time too settle in. Too much checking could cause them to abscound, or they may kill the queen if they think its her fault that they are being bothered so much. Try no more than once a week. Enjoy your bees , It is addicting. Good luck, Ken
 

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Hi,
I agree, try to limit yourself to once a week. Some people consider this to often, but you need practice for learning.

In the bottom box, you might want to move one of the empty frames to the middle. In a couple weeks move another one to the middle. You want all you're frames drawn out, & bees are reluctant to draw the outside frames unless they really need them.

After the bottom box is finished, If the bees still haven't moved into the top, you can switch a brood frame from the bottom with an empty from the top. You might be a few weeks away from doing this.

In the first couple months mites are usually low in numbers on a new hive. Couldn't hurt for you to practice doing a mite count.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks guys, I was hoping I would hear that checking too often is not possible but wishful thinking I guess. I sure dont want to screw anything up by checking too often so Ill limit my time spent in their home.
 

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get more bees. with enough hives, you can inspect a new one every day...:)
 

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If you have a significant honey barrier in the bottom box it may take a while for the girls to explore and draw out a new top box. Though it takes time I move a frame or two of brood from the outside edge of the brood area in the bottom to the center of the upper box, replacing the frames with drawn comb or if I don't have any, foundation. This guarantees that bees will be in the upper box. I also move the division board feeder up to the top box at the same time and feed 1:1 once a week until the girls have 80% of the upper box drawn out. The feeders are generally empty at my weekly inspection but I don't worry about that too much, especially if there is any kind of a flow going on. HTH
 

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I don't think it hurts anything to look at your combs every few days. I just went thru my whole hive ( started 3 weeks ago ) with no vail or gloves. It is such a joy not to have 12angry bees hitting me like a 45 slug and zig-zagging in front of my nose !

I think you are too early on your second story. You have several frames not fully drawn in the bottom super ? They just do not have the "mass" of bees to cover all the bottom yet. They will not touch the upper story until they have more bees. You don't want to "spread the brood" so much that they can't keep it warm. BE PATIENT ! They'll get there.
 

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I agree, it is REALLY hard to stay out of the hives. I started with 2 hives, one left home and I was lucky enough to get a replacement package from Yulander on Mothers day. I am paranoid about them leaving so I go look at the entrances twice a day just to see them coming and going. I also peek at the top feeders daily even though they aren't taking it too fast. With all this I am able to restrain myself and go through the frames only once a week.
I am really loving this hobby! :lookout:
 

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I agree, It is REALLY hard to stay out of the hives. I am new, started with 2 hives and one promptly left after freeing the Queen. :eek: I was lucky enough to get a new package from Yulelander on Mothers Day. :applause: I am almost paranoid about them. I go and just look at them to see them flying a couple times a day. I also peek at the feeder and lift the box an just peek at the top of the frames. This doesnt seem to bother them and helps me stay out and only check all the frames weekly. I will feel better once I spot the Queens, not just brood.
I love this hobby! :lookout:
 

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Victory is right - it doesn't sound like you are ready for a 2nd deep yet. I like to see the bottom box practically overflowing with bees - on a warm day bees should fill every seam and all frames but 1 & 10 should be fully drawn - before I judge the 2nd box as needed.
 

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I I will feel better once I spot the Queens, not just brood.
I love this hobby! :lookout:
What is the need to see the queen? If you have brood and eggs you obviously have a queen. Going into the hive all the time could injure or kill the queen then you would have to go and check for her, sounds like the chicken and egg thing doesn't it.
Realistically if you see the foragers bringing in pollen you can assume that you have brood and can leave them alone, then only check every week or 2 to determine that all is OK and whether you need to add equipment.
 

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That is the premise I have been using. BUT, went in today and got stung on my little finger through the glove. I was so startled I dropped the frame:cry:. Boy were they mad. Since I have no idea if she was on the frame, I have no Idea if I hurt her. I finished looking at the frames, sort of my version of getting back on the horse LOL. Closed it up and they settled right down so I hope not.
 

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We beeks do not agree always. I respect Peter's view that we should not open the hive so often. I am more liberal about opening the hive. You will have to decide for yourself what is best for you and your bees on this issue.
 
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