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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

Last friday i noticed that one of my hives is week and there are little amount of eggs, slow foundation build and more drones that i saw in my last inspection.

I thought my queen is sick or has any problem with her fertileness and came prepered for taking actions.

After i opened the hive, i found out that everything is o.k, there are many eggs and, pollen and suffient honey and population. I suppose that the flood they experienced and few cold days were the couse for that slowness. ;)

Here is a link to pictures of this inspection, not good ones but can give a clue of the hive health:
http://picasaweb.google.com/Tzin.Honey/AfterSomeShinyDaysInspection#

Good day,
Randi
 

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I noticed some capped drone comb. I would take a uncapping fork and pull out several drone larva at a time and check their back sides for varroa and look in the cells. This is a good first step to monitor varroa levels, and at the same time dispose of some varroa before they are ready to emerge.
The hive looks good. If their is not much pollen to gather, I would feed them a patty and add some feed 1:1 since you want this hive to grow.

You say you came prepared. Does that mean you bought a queen to replace the one you had? What are you going to do with that queen now?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the Varroa advice, i will do so in my next inspection.

I came prepered to minimize brood combs to only two with another two honey combs border them and to add feeder with 1:1 feeding. In other words, to come back to a NUC in a 10 frame box and get rid of frames with many drone cells.

put in the weak hive and a brood frame with 20% eggs and 80% capped brood from the healthy hive to the weak one, so the workers could grow a queen cell and wait for success.:s

Randi
 

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if there are no flowers for them to gather nectar, or they are not bringing in pollen, I would feed them even though they have some stores. Feeding will stimulate the bees to rear more brood. As well, since the bees are young, there might not be many foragers yet. It takes 20 day or so for the emerged bees to start to forage. Feeding them will help the population grow and get ready for the up coming nectar flow. If this hive is for honey production and you are not rearing queens, and if you feel you have alot of drones, knock out some of the drone comb you have and let them rebuild the cells for worker size.

Watch that the upcoming eggs are not all drone eggs. You will know in a week or so if the eggs recently layed are drones or not. if you start to see more drone cells, you might consider requeening.
 
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