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Well, heat - and sweating, is an aspect of beekeeping I never considered much, until yesterday when doing a thorough hive inspection. Wow, it wasn't even that hot out but by the time I was finished I was beet red and sweating bullets! I swear I was about to have heat stroke. So my question is what are the drawbacks of doing inspections much later when it starts to cool off? Or earlier before it starts to heat up? Does anyone do it?
 

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I do it as soon as the sunshine & temperature permit. It was 75 at 9 am yesterday, and I was into the hives while I had the chance. Today, we'll be lucky to hit 75, plus there's a stiff NW breeze. Not a good day to be lookin' at the brood.
 

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I'm in Florida and if I wait till past 10 or so, it's miserable.
I've done my inspections at 8-ish, and yup the frames are heavier with all the bees, but everything works out fine. They aren't any more aggressive or anything!
 

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I do my inspections around 8 or 9 AM temperature permitting. It seems to me they are calmer before the heat of the day. I am finding I do not use smoke any more for my morning inspections. I personally believe that smoke causes more stress to the hive and if I can get in and out with very little fuss while the bees are in their down mode it allows for a quicker recovery time. Beekeeping for dummies says it takes two day for a hive to fully recover after an inspection. I think my bees recover in a few hours.
Just my opinion :scratch:
 

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What is the lowest temperature I can inspect without it harming brood?
It depends. If there's no wind, you can get by with a lower temp (for me, 65 degrees). And it also depends on how quick you are.

There was a big discussion earlier this year re: temps for installing packages but with brood, it's a different situation.
 
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