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I just put on a second story (deep) and wonder when the upstairs is built out, do I need to inspect the lower deep? If so, how often? And if I need to inspect the lower unit, where do I set the upper deep? My concern is losing/upsetting the queen if she happens to be "upstairs".

Thanks for any info.
 

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Hi Be,
You will want to take a look at the bottom deep once in a while to make sure they're using it, but you'll probably not "need" to inspect it very often. You may "want" to inspect it, as part of the learning curve, but you won't really "need" to do so.
When you inspect, take off the telescoping top cover and place it up side down next to the hive. When you finish inspecting the top deep, place it inside the inverted telescoping top (it will act as a bottom board). Then when you're finished with the inspection of the bottom deep, simply replace the top deep exactly as it was before on top of the bottom and replace the telescoping top on top of it.
 

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I'm a new beek and thought that was a good question and answer. My question is why don't we put second hive body on the bottom of the first? As I see alot of talk here about bee's naturally want to build down.
 

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Bees want to naturally build up.
 

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I agree Mike. You would really have to crowd them to get them to build comb below the brood nest. A good, and widely used trick is to pull frames # 1 & 10 ( or maybe 2 & 9 ) from the full hive body and put them in the 5 & 6 position in the new, empty super above ( or possibly the 4 & 6 position ). This will tend to "bate and bridge" them upward.
Some of us, ( like me ) believe in reversing the brood chamber under certain conditions. This should only be done when the colony is strong and the weather is warm. Over time ( probably several months ) they will fill-out the upper super and gradually move into it as the primary brood nest.
When you check the lower ( old ) super in August chances are it will be mostly empty comb ( ripe for the SHB ). If you reverse the supers the brood nest will move up once again into the partially vacant combs.
Reversing the brood nest is primarily useful for swarm prevention, to reclaim the abandoned comb on the bottom. Swarming usually cannot be prevented by reversing once they begin building swarm cells.
 

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Thanks to all with info. Ok so you should add 2nd hive body on top of first.

I thought that the bottom deep would always stay full of brood, pollen, honey etc. and bees as they felt crowded they would move up and fill up the second hive body. I assumed with adequete forage I would carry over 2 full hive bodys of bees for winter.
So we add honey supers when BOTH hive bodys are mostly full. Why don't they feel the need to swarm when the 2nd hive body gets full?
thanks, Tom
 

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Yes...build up from the bottom up...and yes...two deep supers should be ok to get your bees through the winter IF there is plenty of honey stored in them. When the bottom brood box gets 7 or 8 frames drawn, you can go ahead and add the second brood box and they will build up as the days go along and draw out the foundation and begin filling up the combs with brood, pollen, nectar, bees etc. As for swarming...by the time your second deep gets filled the "swarm season" should be declining. Of course there is no guarantee that your bees won't swarm...but as a general rule this works.
 

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If you choose not to inspect your bottom deep, because you think your hive is robust and healthy--don't tell anyone here on beesource.
 

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In case anyone is wondering about me, I plan on treating my bee's like their all queens! I wouldn't have spent my money or time to treat them any other way! Of all I've read about the care of our bee's in these forums led me to believe the care is all over the board. Good to bad. Hense the tag line.
 

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As their brood operation moves up into the upper deep super, they will gradually use the lower hive body less. Chances are you will find lots of empty comb in late summer, especially as brood rearing slows down. In my area August is very slow ( no honeyflow ).
If you put foundation on them when there is no honeyflow, they just "frost" it, chew holes in it, track it up, and generally damage it. THEY WILL NOT DRAW COMB with no honeyflow ! So why waste your foundation !
It makes more sense to make them use that vacant comb in the bottom brood chamber by putting it on top ( reversing ).

By the way, you have my WRITTEN permission to examine the bottom brood chamber as you see fit. Monthly sounds about right.
 
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