Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
641 Posts
Last year I varied my vent size based on bearding. I did not finish this but could vary the bearding by changing the vent. Will work on this more this year. Note that I live in a hot, wet climate. Results may vary.:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
I make a screen inner cover with 3/4" blocks to elevate the top cover, you can adjust the vent by putting a piece of plywood with different size holes. Cover the holes as needed, during the summer in Florida, I use just an open screen under the top to cure the bearding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,543 Posts
I am looking into enlarging the opening in the inner cover vent. My question is how large to make it? What size do you run in your inner cover?
What size are they currently? We aim to run ours 3/4 in.(always faced down), but some come out slightly larger:shhhh: Depending on the hive, and their sense of what they need, I have seen them sealed, unsealed just enough for a bee to fit through, & wide open.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,323 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The ones I run are about 3/8" deep and 3/4" wide.
The goal is to provide enough ventillation in the winter to avoid condensation issues.
I already insulate on top of the inner cover, but am wondering if the openong is too small.
Just trying to get a sense of what others run.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,291 Posts
The ones I run are about 3/8" deep and 3/4" wide.
The goal is to provide enough ventillation in the winter to avoid condensation issues.
I already insulate on top of the inner cover, but am wondering if the openong is too small.
Just trying to get a sense of what others run.

A few of my strong hives were working on closing the upper entrance hole with screened bottoms, they added about 1/4" of thick propolis to the entire perimeter

This winter I ran no top vent at all with 1" insulation on 6 hives. The strongest hives with 2 deeps and 1 shallow did have some condensation issues. The condensation must have been on the underside of the inner cover. The corners about 3" triangles were damp and started to turn brown. Not an issue most of the winter until mid-february when brood rearing ramped up, got worse and worse and finally I added a vent notch in the foam insulation in early march. Still condensation on the perimeter of the insulation where it meets the rim of the inner cover.

The single and double deep hives had absolutely no condensation on the inner cover thru winter. 1 hive started to have small amount condensation around the rim in late february when brood rearing was ramping up and pollen started coming in. Perhaps even a small amount of nectar.

All hives still alive and very strong. My theory is the top vent allows vents most heat away and they use less honey. The less air that vents while controlling moustire is idea. Any moisture will fall to the bottom and condense on the cold inspection board. I think the tall hives had the most condensation because the airflow was much less uptop then a single and double. Also the clusters are larger.

Ill take some pics tommorow and post.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Seems to me that if you make the vent bee space size or larger, you invite robbing, if you make it smaller, the bees will tend to seal it up. If you want ventilation, and are a hobby bee keeper, not a hundred hive pro. then just move the top super about 1/8 inch back, giving a nice vent space too long for the bees to seal very fast, and yet too narrow for robbers to enter. also eliminates the need for a vent hole and plug. but what do I know, I am just an inexperienced newbee.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top