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My great uncle is aging and dementia is taking its toll. We enjoyed a nice afternoon on his property yesterday and he lit up when I told him I was getting ready to start beekeeping. He showed me to the back corner of the barn where this old extractor was tucked away.

Can anyone provide any info on it? Age? Value? It's not going anywhere regardless of value but I don't want to restore it for use if it would ruin it.
 

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My great uncle is aging and dementia is taking its toll. We enjoyed a nice afternoon on his property yesterday and he lit up when I told him I was getting ready to start beekeeping. He showed me to the back corner of the barn where this old extractor was tucked away.

Can anyone provide any info on it? Age? Value? It's not going anywhere regardless of value but I don't want to restore it for use if it would ruin it.
Buy some Camecote paint to cover its galvanized interior and it is probably pretty close to serviceable. The bearing are easily replaceable. Just remove the crank on the straight shaft and power with a drill and you are good to go. Using it is a tribute to the old beek.
 

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You can replace it for $200 and keep that as is for it's sentimental and historical value.
 

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You will not retire on the proceeds.
 

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We purchased it's peer, as a museum piece, for around 50 dollars. As for age, I would guess that it is from the very early 1900's. Previous they where made from wood barrels. Could you get a close up of the lower A.I.Root badge?? One curious aspect is the word "Cowen" on the label. There is a manufacturer in Utah by that name, but I had never seen that name and Root together before,.

Crazy Roland
 

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Another reference to Cowan is this found on a listing for a two-frame extractor. Which gives some idea of the date of the Cowans Root relationship.

"Up for auction is my Grandfather's A.I. Root Company two (2) comb honey extractor. It is a Cowan's Rapid Extractor No. 17 manufactured in Medina, Ohio USA and dates to approx. 1915 - 1920. This extractor came out with his bee's and bee keeping equipment on two flat cars in the early 1920's from Racine, Wisc. to Southern Calif. It was used in his Honey Business which was sold to Miller Honey after his death in the 1950's by my Grandmother. The unit is all original and still works. Needs a good steam cleaning as it has been in a storage locker for years. It is galvanized metal with 2 handles to carry and measures 24" wide by 31-1/2" tall to to top of tub or 32" tall to top of gear housing. It probably belongs in a museum as part of Americana heritage. "
 

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You can replace it for $200 and keep that as is for it's sentimental and historical value.
I also inherited my dad's extractor from the 1940's or 50's. I used it for two seasons, then wrapped it up and put it in my bee shed because a newer electric one made life so much easier. Still very happy I got the old one -- and an old, wooden ice cream maker from about that same time period. Both sentimental especially since I grew up using them back in the 1970's and 80's.
 

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Could you get a close up of the lower A.I.Root badge?? One curious aspect is the word "Cowen" on the label. There is a manufacturer in Utah by that name, but I had never seen that name and Root together before,.
There are other countries in the world besides America where bees are kept, and where beekeeping equipment is designed and manufactured :)
Amos Root had a tendency to appropriate whatever designs he thought would sell, and so I'm not at all surprised that those two names can be seen together.

These are graphics taken from Thomas Cowan's 'The British Beekeepers Guide Book' 20th Edition, 1911, the 1st Edition of which was published in 1881. The extractors themselves first came onto the market in 1875.





LJ
 

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Little John. Atta boy, your explanation is more likely than mine.

Crazy Roland
:)
Apparently Cowan was quite a character - in his book 'Honey Farming' Manley tells of one beekeeper's meeting he attended in which, when Cowen entered the room, everybody stood up and wouldn't take their seats until Cowan was seated. LOL Such deference - could never see that happening these days ...
'best
LJ
 
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