Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
210 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi all and thanks for those who gave me good advice on catching the swarm yesterday. All went well!

Question: same guy called me today and there seems to be more bees. However- unlike the easily accessible swarm cluster yesterday, these seem to have established a colony in the side of his stone exterior wall of the house. He sent me a pic and it seems there’s an entry/exit hole between the stones but the colony isn’t visible- ie deeper within the exterior wall. Complicated by the fact that this is approx 12’ up.

I‘m assuming there’s nothing to do in this situation- that the colony is not accessible and his options are either to 1) let them live there (other than having bees I can’t see a downside for him right? They don’t excavate/damage as far as I know..) or 2)if he’s bothered by them he’ll have to spray them/destroy the colony. Obviously not great options either way but I don’t think anyone could vacuum these out/salvage the colony, right?

Any advice much appreciated.

(Someone around him is missing a butt load of bees ...)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
728 Posts
If they are going in the stone wall they most likely are behind the plaster or drywall in side.
Find someone in your area who has an infrared camera and check the inside wall in that area.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
210 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
thanks--

I'm not familiar w escape cones (though I get the concept, like an escape board).

from what I see it's shear vertical wall so I've have to adhere the cone somehow.. and also I'm guessing the queen wouldn't be captured.

I guess the biggest question is this: is there any downside to him just leaving them there? If there are in the wall (behind the plaster etc), would they cause damage or just occupy the space there? I figure the biggest downside is if the colony dies then upcapped nectar etc could ferment plus dead bees--> smell. But unlikely I think.

Plus... it's some added insulation/heat in the winter!

(if only he could drill through and install an EZ flow system in the wall...)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
728 Posts
They can chew through to the inside of the house.
Also when they get larger you can hear them in the wall.
When I lived in Cochranville Pa. we had a farm house and if you went in the attic you could hear buzzing.
Years later when the people who bought it from us removed the plaster to finish the area off the south wall was FULL of bees.
About 20' w x 10'h at the peak, packed. They were going in and out at the chimney.
This was about 2 years before I started keeping bees.
 

·
Registered
2020 8 hives
Joined
·
181 Posts
If you go to the forum: Swarms, Cut outs and Trap outs you can read a full page of questions and see what is involved with these bee related activities. In my opinion this isn't something a beginner should try.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,096 Posts
from what I see it's shear vertical wall so I've have to adhere the cone somehow.. and also I'm guessing the queen wouldn't be captured.
Duct tape should work :)

Here is a thread that uses a cone to trap out a hive. There are others if you search, but this is the first one that I found
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,939 Posts
Yes they have to be dealt with. I know someone who was eating dinner and her dining room ceiling collapsed on the table. A very large honey filled colony weighs a lot. Not to mention it will draw mice and other insects, especially if the colony dies out.
Def a job for someone with experience. J
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
210 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
yeah I'm not messing with this. I'm just trying to figure out the best advice to give him. Also- I'm guessing that the humidity alone from a colony in the unventilated space behind a wall would be awful w mold and corrosion to electrical wires etc

anyway, I think the best advice for him at this point (though it breaks my heart to suggest this) is to climb up there in the evening with a veil on and empty a can of spray into the entrance. I can't imaging any other solution that doesn't require major stuff like breaking into an internal wall etc.

Thanks for the input.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,336 Posts
+1. If the options are exterminate or attempt a trap-out, it seems like there's little to lose (in my very humble opinion) to try one's hand at trapping them out provided the location is otherwise accessible to set-up a trap rig. At a 12 foot entrance height, a sturdy A-frame step ladder might be an option to both locate the trapping set-up and gain access to the same for inspection. Just a suggestion, as I can certainly understand and appreciate why someone would not want to attempt it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,492 Posts
I think the best advice for him at this point (though it breaks my heart to suggest this) is to climb up there in the evening with a veil on and empty a can of spray into the entrance. I can't imaging any other solution that doesn't require major stuff like breaking into an internal wall etc.
This is actually the worst advice.., In my experience, this always comes back to cost more (mess, repairs from the “melt down”, damage to structure, etc.) in the long run, even when “professional” done. I would suggest doing nothing before this. Especially, if he doesn’t know how long they have been there. Although, I am sure they said they just noticed them a few weeks ago:D
 

·
Super Moderator
Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
Joined
·
6,257 Posts
Spraying a hive inside a wall is a really terrible idea, unless the homeowner prefers mice and roaches to the bees. Time to call a professional bee removal service, not an exterminator. If the colony is small, as determined by an infrared camera or a borescope, a trapout may work. Otherwise, it is full on cutout. The money spent to deal with this problem properly now will be far less than what it will cost later to fix the ensuing damge that killing the hive will cause.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top