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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just took a quick look into a hive that had capped supercedure cells around June 12-13. I suspect there's a queen in the hive but maybe not yet mated, or maybe mated but not yet laying. That is - no eggs yet. The bees were kind of all moving in a similar direction as I moved frames, which is the way they move in a boxed swarm when they're moving toward the queen.

Can anyone confirm this for me? I suspect they may have been showing me that there is a queen. Would they move toward an unmated queen or might this be a sign of a newly mated queen but not yet laying?

Thanks, Karen
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Karen, if the cells were still capped on the 12th of June, there is no way the queen is mated yet. But, it sounds like she has emerged and the bees know they are queenright. I would wait at least another week,.maybe two would be better, before poking around in the hive again. After two weeks, you should see eggs and young larvae.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks JW. Yes I didn’t look at my notes about the date until after I had taken a quick look in the hive. It’s the one that I shook into foundation because of the poor performance of the hive and undiagnosed problem. This is the hive I posted about a while back that had a spotty brood pattern and poor looking brood. But nothing concrete on diagnosis. I sort of expected they’d do a little drawing out of foundation but it appears they’re just taking the syrup I’ve been feeding them and storing it instead of using it to draw out wax. Somewhat surprised. Maybe once the queen gets mated they’ll start making space for her to lay eggs. (just in case you’re wondering where they have space to store syrup, I did give them one full deep frame of capped brood and that brood has been emerging, and the frame that the queen cell was on.)
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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I notice that my nucs are not inclined to draw new comb until there is a mated and laying queen in the hive, and they need the space. Once they have a fair amount of stored syrup, stop feeding until the queen is laying. Then give them a piece of pollen patty and start feeding again. If you over feed now, there is a potential that there will be little room for the queen to lay. Another option is to continue feeding now in the hopes that it encourages them to build comb, but be prepared to add empty drawn comb once the queen starts up and remove some of the syrup bound frames.
 
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