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Hello folks It's been awhile since I've been here I've been wheelchair bound for a couple years but since the end Of December I've gotten to where I could walk a little with a walker and around June I had even shucked the walker I still use a staff but thank God I'm on my two feet. Last year I was so depressed and just didn't care for anything a man came and asked about my beegear and I practically gave him everything I had. I realize even though I'm able to walk now there's noway I could carry any weight around but I so miss my GIRLS there's about 15 Sourwood trees behind my house and everytime I see them I'd just go aw man!! My
Question to you all Is there anyone here that knows anything about the Slovenia Beehouses and the AZ Hives?? I'm under no Illusions that I could be back in the wheelchair anytime and I think I could still work the ladies even in a wheelchair if I used this system.
 

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Have you thought about a horizontal / long hive. You could adjust the height of the box to match a wheelchair, so you could still work the hives.
 

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Have you thought about a horizontal / long hive. You could adjust the height of the box to match a wheelchair, so you could still work the hives.
+1 ... and, if you were to make the box with splayed legs, KTBH-style, then the hive itself could offer some support for yourself whilst standing - providing you don't lean against it with too much weight. :)

Re: the A-Z Hives - it is possible to make these as 'stand-alone' hives, without requiring the usual bee-shed. Uncommon, sure, but it has been done. Worth bearing in mind if you should only want a handful of hives ...
LJ
 

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Ya my vote is the horizontal w/ Lang frames, always wanted to build one. Plus one can incorporate honey boxes too.
Sounds like you’ve come a long way Ken, hang tough!
 

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Another thing that I have seen a picture of is somone that put "car tailgate struts" on the lid of a long langstrom to make it easier to lift the lid. If you go the route of a long hive this may make it a lot easier to check the hive.
 

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you tube Drebbieville Hives, also a website TheBeeshope.com I have two boxes, hives , both at waist level so I don't have to bend over, they can be set at any height you choose, also have them in an unused bedroom with room for 4 more, working bees with ac is life saving here in Texas summers. I also have 20 plus lang hives. Brian Drebber has made it very easy by using lang dimensions. It does take some getting use to but no heavy lifting and being inside the hives are climate control if you wish, cool in summer and warm in winter. Also the bees are less aggressive being inside they are mostly looking to get out in the open. I see no problem for you working them in a wheelchair, after all Brian Drebber works his on a brake stool in his you tube video. I hope to move all my hives inside a building with heat and ac, even the langs. Good luck with your health and hope you have a new adventure in beekeeping.
 

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Hello folks It's been awhile since I've been here I've been wheelchair bound for a couple years but since the end Of December I've gotten to where I could walk a little with a walker and around June I had even shucked the walker I still use a staff but thank God I'm on my two feet. .
Here is a beekeeping channel ran by a guy on wheelchair, to give a perspective.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t7IONSjPQ8g

Horizontal hives set to your comfortable height are a good way to go.
Simple too.

Do realize, the AZ hives set inside some structure will give you a lot of grief too.
They are not exactly ergonomic.

A horizontal hive with a flipping-up lid is much more ergonomic.
 

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Good to hear you are improving. A horizontal hive sounds interesting. See if you can find a helper, that’s what I will be doing. Don’t give up, take each day at a time.
 

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I have long Langstroths, horizontal top bar hives and AZ hives. Any of them could help with your issues. I think the most practical as far as available equipment and cost, is the long Langstroth. If you plan to put it at easy height to work, and it's as windy as Nebraska, you'll need to stake it to the ground solidly. They blow over here if I put them up in the air.
 

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Yes I'm looking at that but how could I get the full frames to the house if i didn't have help.
 

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Yes this is what I'm looking at because I believe I could do everything and have something to hold on to if I needed to move around.
 

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Yes since I'm on disability so Money is an issue so I guess the long hive is my best bet But I have one problem I live on the side of a hill to get to the hive would be easy getting back to the house would be a little rough. I have my Father in Law looking into how much it would cost to make a 30 deep frame long hive.
 

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View attachment 51401 View attachment 51403

If you have someone who can help you build the hives you can custom make them to your needs (and it can be inexpensive since you can use material you have around).
I built these top bar and long lang hives with the material I had. They didn't cost more that $25.

Another thing that might help you with stability and with the wind issue that Michael Bush mentioned, is to set them in the ground. I was given some industrial black water pipe so I cut them to the height I wanted and set them in a little concrete. The hive (either top bar or long lang) is screwed to the legs using electrical conduit collars. You can't move the legs but you can unscrew the hive and move it if you need to (I never do).
This will also give you a very sturdy hive to lean against if you need to.

Also a must have is a hinged roof. You don't need to be worried about lifting a roof off the hive.
Both the top bar and the long lang work well because you're only lifting one frame/bar at a time.
You can do an AZ hive without the building but you'll still be lifting a frame at a time and the hives can be fairly expensive.

If you have any equipment left you can build the hive to fit whatever size gear you have. All my top bar and long langs are built to fit medium lang frames because I also have Langstroth hives and I like being able to exchange resources.

Also, is there any reason your hive can't be set closer to your house? Just google images of long langstroth or horizontal hive or top bar hive and you'll get a bunch of great ideas.

I hope you'll try getting back into beekeeping and keep up the great progress.
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I've been through 2 hip replacements while working my topbar hives and they are so easy compared to the medium 8 frame ones I also have. (I've also tried the horizontal Lang, but still prefer the topbar arrangement as do my bees). I get my $150 kits from Beeline Woodenware in MI or one of their local distributors. I do add a long window in all of them so I can peek in anytime I want (especially winter). They can go on whatever hive stand height you need. The great thing about this kit is I modified the heavy roof to be just the tin that fits snuggly over the end walls, so I'm never lifting anything over a 7# honey bar. There are more photos of the kit on my bees' Facebook page listed in my signature line.

And if you are looking still into the Drebbieville hive, which is much more expensive, a local guy here in Chesapeake is the distributor for them in our area. For that look up www.handsonbeekeepers.com
 
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